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The Supplement This Nutritionist Recommends To Keep You (And Your Entire Family) Healthy

Maya Feller
Image by Maya Fellar / Contributor
July 28, 2020

My work as a dietitian centers around helping my patients manage their current diagnosis of noncommunicable diseases like diabetes, hypertension, or cardiovascular disease. I also strive to help reduce their risk of developing these conditions. 

I've said it time and time again: "There is no one size that fits all," and my job as a care provider is to meet the patient where they are while creating a holistic plan that takes the individual into consideration. 

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Vegetables, fruits, and other nutrient-rich foods are a priority.

When I think about sustainable nutrition, I consider the whole person, including their work, family, and life balance when making recommendations around vegetable and fruit consumption. 

In general, recommendations from all health agencies support regular and consistent intake of vegetables, fruits, legumes, beans, nuts, seeds, and ancient grains. It's also important, when possible, to consume these foods in their whole and minimally processed form with limited added sugars, salts, and synthetic fats. 

Current nutrition research tells us that the majority of people living in the U.S. follow the standard American diet. One that is rich in refined grains, added sugars, salts, and saturated or synthetic fats. Many people are not meeting the daily recommended intake for vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, and this increases the risk of developing noncommunicable diseases. In fact, the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines note that three-quarters of the population follows a pattern of eating that is low in vegetables and fruits.

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Why organic veggies+ is a go-to in my household.

In addition to being a dietitian, I am a mom and lover of all plants. In my family, everyone knows that I keep up with research and work hard to make vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds, and ancient grains all a part of our regular rotation. Also, I add vegetables to everything! I've been known to season all of my vegetables and fruits—even salads get fresh herbs or a layering of greens. I play with temperature and texture as well as form (think: fresh, frozen, dried, and powdered). 

mbg’s organic veggies + is a favorite in our home... As a veggie-loving mom, I find myself reaching for this blend most days.

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To make sure my family is getting enough fruits and vegetables, mbg's organic veggies+ is a favorite in our home.* It's a fantastic organic whole food blend of vegetables and fruits that even contains sea veggies. The greens powder is also vegetarian, so it meets the needs of everyone in the family, including my vegetarian son.

I often add the blend to homemade pancakes, breads, and smoothies. It gives whatever dish I'm making a phytonutrient boost in a tiny package.* organic veggies+ is very easy to use, and you can add it to most any dish you prepare. As a veggie-loving mom, I find myself reaching for this blend most days.

Maya Feller, M.S., R.D., CDN
Maya Feller, M.S., R.D., CDN
Registered Dietitian & Cookbook Author

Maya Feller, MS, RD, CDN is a Registered Dietitian who specializes in nutrition for chronic disease prevention. She received her masters of science in nutrition at New York University and completed her clinical nutrition training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. After graduating, Maya established a DOHMH funded food and nutrition program in an outpatient setting where she oversaw the nutrition program, counseled patients and was responsible for the daily soup kitchen and weekly food pantry where she partnered with neighborhood CSAs and food co-ops to bring local and organic food to her clients.

Maya shares her approachable, real food based solutions to millions of people through regular speaking engagements and as a nutrition expert on The Dr. Oz Show and Good Morning America. She's also an adjunct professor at NYU where she teaches nutrition and lectures at nutrition symposia. When she's not hard at work, you may spot Maya out for a run, shopping at the Park Slope Food Coop or enjoying a delicious meal with her family.