The Low-Lift Way To Add More Nutrients To Your Meals, According To An MD

mbg Editorial Assistant By Abby Moore
mbg Editorial Assistant
Abby Moore is an Editorial Assistant at mindbodygreen. She earned a B.A. in Journalism from The University of Texas at Austin and has previously written for Tribeza magazine.
Sea Veggies: Eat More Of This Type Of Veggie To Keep Your Body At Its Healthiest

Enjoying an elaborate meal three times a day sounds great in theory, but most days, there's not enough time or energy to spend cooking. However, just because a meal isn't time-consuming to create doesn't mean it has to lack nutrients.

To ensure a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals in every meal, family medicine doctor Robert Rountree, M.D., recommends adding sea veggies to your diet. 

Why sea veggies?

In a mindbodygreen podcast episode, Rountree says sea vegetables, like kelp and chlorella, are a great source of nutrients. They provide antioxidants, like vitamins A, C, E, and beta-carotene. Seaweed is also a gut-friendly source of dietary fiber and prebiotics, which can help enhance digestion.* 

organic veggies+

organic veggies+

Finally, a greens blend powered by organic sea veggies to fight inflammation*

★ ★ ★ ★ ★
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
(4.9)
organic veggies+

Kelp is especially favored for its high—but not too high—iodine levels. The recommended dietary allowance for iodine is 150 micrograms per day, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). "The problem is that we don't get enough iodine in our diet," Rountree says. While iodine supplements may help some people increase their intake, they may cause others to exceed the recommended value, which can increase the risk for hyper- or hypothyroidism.

To take the guesswork out of it, Rountree says kelp is the best source of iodine. "It's organic. It's going to be processed in a way that your body can use it. And it's very difficult to overdose from kelp," he explains. 

Along with kelp, Rountree recommends the green algae chlorella. "They have a particular type of polysaccharide in them that actually binds to heavy metals and toxins," he says. Studies show by binding to heavy metals, chlorella can help rid the gastrointestinal tract, muscles, ligaments, connective tissue, and bones of too much mercury.*

Advertisement

How to get more sea veggies in the diet. 

One of the best ways to incorporate sea veggies into your diet is through a greens powder that features these superfoods, such as mbg's organic veggies+. This supplement makes it easy to enhance the nutritional value of smoothies or baked goods.

While you can also add sea veggies to the diet through seaweed salads, Rountree says many are high in sugar, so it's important to eat those in moderation. 

Regardless of the form, "We all need more sea veggies," Rountree says.

Advertisement

More On This Topic

More Health

Popular Stories

Advertisement

Latest Articles

Latest Articles
Advertisement

Sites We Love

Your article and new folder have been saved!