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This 2-Minute Dance Routine Can Majorly Decrease Stress (No Coordination Required)

Emma Loewe
mbg Senior Sustainability Editor
By Emma Loewe
mbg Senior Sustainability Editor
Emma Loewe is the Senior Sustainability Editor at mindbodygreen and the author of "Return to Nature: The New Science of How Natural Landscapes Restore Us."
Image by Miachel Breton
October 24, 2018

Here at mbg, we believe in Mindful Movement. In our video series, we'll break down various moves designed to help you take care of your physical body and connect you to your emotional and spiritual self. This week, we're having a dance party with yogi Zoe Welch.

You'd be surprised by just how much an impromptu dance party can solve. Moving the body to music is incredibly therapeutic; It's known to release "happy hormones" like dopamine and serotonin in the brain and has even been shown to improve cognitive function in older adults.

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And you don't need to be a professional (or even know your way around a dance floor) to reap some of these benefits. Simply meeting yourself where you are, turning on one of your favorite songs, and moving your body however you feel called is a quick way to express yourself so you can walk away feeling a little lighter. For the next few weeks, we'll be hanging out with yogi and dancer Zoe Welch to learn some simple moves to call on the next time you're feeling stressed. First up, the box step!

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Emma Loewe
Emma Loewe
mbg Senior Sustainability Editor

Emma Loewe is the Senior Sustainability Editor at mindbodygreen and the author of Return to Nature: The New Science of How Natural Landscapes Restore Us. She is also the co-author of The Spirit Almanac: A Modern Guide To Ancient Self Care, which she wrote alongside Lindsay Kellner.

Emma received her B.A. in Environmental Science & Policy with a specialty in environmental communications from Duke University. In addition to penning over 1,000 articles on mbg, her work has appeared on Bloomberg News, Marie Claire, Bustle, and Forbes. She has covered everything from the water crisis in California to the rise of urban beekeeping to a group of doctors prescribing binaural beats for anxiety. She's spoken about the intersection of self-care and sustainability on podcasts and live events alongside environmental thought leaders like Marci Zaroff, Gay Browne, and Summer Rayne Oakes.