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Study Finds Kiwi Is A+ For Easing Bloat & Supporting Digestion

Jamie Schneider
Author:
August 27, 2021
Jamie Schneider
mbg Beauty & Wellness Editor
By Jamie Schneider
mbg Beauty & Wellness Editor
Jamie Schneider is the Beauty & Wellness Editor at mindbodygreen, covering beauty and wellness. She has a B.A. in Organizational Studies and English from the University of Michigan, and her work has appeared in Coveteur, The Chill Times, and Wyld Skincare.
Image by Nadine Greeff / Stocksy
August 27, 2021

Oh, bloating, you are most unwelcome. When the "stuffed," heavy feeling swells your belly, you may be willing to try anything—anything!—to ease the uncomfortable feeling: hydration, yoga poses, massage, you name it. 

Well, what about...kiwi? According to a clinical trial published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, kiwi might be the best fruit to ease bloating and promote regularity.* Allow us to introduce you to the digestion-aiding wonders of the kiwifruit. 

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How kiwi can help. 

The thing is, kiwi isn't random at all: It has a long history of use in Traditional Chinese Medicine for its ability to aid digestion; not to mention, kiwi is full of fiber—which is great for helping your bowels run smoothly. The tangy fruit also contains a special proteolytic enzyme, called actinidin, which helps break down protein.

And compared to other well-known fruits and plant-based fibers for digestion (prunes and psyllium, specifically), kiwi may come out on top. 

During the experiment, researchers separated 79 participants into three groups: The first received two green kiwifruits; the second received 100 grams of prunes (by the way, that's about 10 average-size prunes); and the third gobbled down 12 grams of psyllium fiber. Each group consumed their assigned fruit or fiber every day for four weeks.

During that time, they recorded their daily bloating and digestion experiences through an online symptom assessment tool. After the four-week period, they were evaluated again: What was their bloating and digestion like, and how well did they tolerate the nutrition intervention? 

Now, the results you came for: While all three nutrition strategies helped increase bowel movement rate, stool consistency, and eased straining, only the mighty kiwi helped improve bloating, in particular. Not to mention, kiwi had the best side effect profile (i.e., fewer complaints): The participants who ate kiwi were less likely to report abdominal discomfort after eating the fruit, perhaps because kiwis are also low in FODMAPS (as opposed to prunes, which may not be as well tolerated by some people's small intestine). 

In other words, you can add kiwi to your list of nutrient-dense foods that help aid digestion and ease bloating (find our master list here). Or if you don't feel like reaching into the fridge whenever you feel your stomach swell—sometimes the last thing you want to do is eat more food, no?—you can always opt for a high-quality probiotic supplement to promote regularity and abdominal comfort.* mindbodygreen's probiotic+, in particular, contains four targeted strains specifically designed to ease bloating, aid digestion, and elevate your gut microbiome.* 

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The takeaway. 

When it comes to supporting digestion and easing bloat, kiwi is a star—at least, according to this study. A bunch of participants found it helpful, and it generally had no side effects. Who knew this sour fruit was so "sweet" when it comes to healthy digestion?

Jamie Schneider
Jamie Schneider
mbg Beauty & Wellness Editor

Jamie Schneider is the Beauty & Wellness Editor at mindbodygreen. She has a B.A. in Organizational Studies and English from the University of Michigan, and her work has appeared in Coveteur, The Chill Times, and Wyld Skincare. In her role at mbg, she reports on everything from the top beauty industry trends, to the gut-skin connection and the microbiome, to the latest expert makeup hacks. She currently lives in New York City.