True to my millennial roots, I'm always seeking out ways to invest the least time while still producing equal or better results. Yes, you could say I'm "hacking" my way to success in fitness, and in life. Sometimes, it sends me down face first. Still, it ensures that I'm always learning from my mistakes.

I'm a huge fan of this Bill Gates quote: "I will always choose a lazy person to do a difficult job. Because, a lazy person will find an easy way to do it." This experimentation mentality that Bill Gates suggests can have huge impacts on our health and wellness habits. It presents us with the opportunity to shake up our metabolism, move our body and improve our mindset.

Since we all have a unique perception and experience, some tactics stick with us and produce amazing results, while others—that may work for someone else—don't do anything for us.

The experiment that worked for me.

While searching out wellness hacks for my fitness app, Vea Fitness, I was recommended a very small, simple change by a friend. Little did I know, my perspective on life, success, and fitness would pivot, based on this tiny piece of advice.

Here's what I was recommended: Before starting each day, I do 30 pushups and 30 air squats. That's it.

I do this every morning, after drinking a big glass of water. I do it even before I meditate. Doesn't sound like a big commitment, right?

Here's what happened.

The results were astonishing. I can't believe how amazing I feel in the mornings now. This routine creates a sort of energetic momentum or launch pad for the day. It's easy enough that I can always convince myself to work out, but challenging enough to make me break a little sweat.

I'm also not implying that this simple routine will dramatically improve your life but it was my experience. I now have a lot more energy in the morning, my body is more agile-feeling, I'm less achy and creaky in the morning, and my legs are noticeably more toned.

Finding your why.

Before you make a big change, it's a great exercise to dig into "why" we want to make that change. This is as simple as asking yourself "why" three times, and getting to the bottom of your reasoning. Once you understand your why, then you can add in external factors to help spur action.

Using external motivation to your advantage.

In fitness and in life, everyone is motivated by different factors. Some need good music, others need good friends. Some enjoy rewards and instant gratification; and the reason I built an app that rewards you for working out. I personally enjoy earning immediate, tangible rewards for working out.

Still, others may be motivated by emotional wellness, social competition or the luxury of eating an amazing cheat meal. Once you discover that underlying drive, take those learnings, and combine them with your external motivations. Then translate those into a small change you can make today—it's that simple.


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