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A Hypnotist's Favorite Meditation For Calming The Mind Before Bed

Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Writer
By Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Writer
Sarah Regan is a Spirituality & Relationships Writer, and a registered yoga instructor. She received her bachelor's in broadcasting and mass communication from SUNY Oswego, and lives in Buffalo, New York.
Image by Alexey Kuzma / Stocksy
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May 23, 2021

On average, it takes people anywhere from five to 20 minutes to fall asleep—but if you're dealing with a restless mind before bed, a 20-minute wind-down can sound like a pipe dream.

From breathwork to journaling, there are plenty of accessible tools that can help your mind calm down before bed, hypnosis included. Here, a hypnotist shares her favorite pre-bed routine.

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A self-hypnosis meditation to try before bed.

This self-hypnosis meditation from hypnotist and author of Wishcraft Shauna Cummins only takes a few minutes to complete. Ready, set, snooze:

  1. Close your eyes, take three deep breaths, and hold your hand to your heart if you like. 
  2. Review your day in your mind's eye. Pick three things you can thank yourself for from that day (i.e., going to work, calling a friend in need, completing that big project) and imagine in your mind's eye that you thank yourself and you receive appreciation from yourself.
  3. Make three well wishes for three different people in your life, and imagine them receiving the positive energy.
  4. Make three wishes for yourself. They can either be geared toward the day ahead or be more general.
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Why it works.

In just a few simple steps, this meditation primes your mind and attention to track the positive progress in your life, Cummins tells mbg. It also reinforces a mindscape of abundance, appreciation, and compassion—and there's even some research to show that gratitude is associated with greater self-reported sleep quality and sleep duration.

"Before you go to sleep, the mind is very receptive," Cummins says, noting it's an ideal time to plant positive seeds of suggestion that help to form new neural pathways and supportive associations. "This counteracts the brain's negativity bias and over time can increase self-worth and resilience," she adds.

So the next time you're struggling to doze off, give this self-hypnosis routine a try. The nighttime hours are the perfect time to practice positive thinking so you can get to sleep and wake up feeling rested.

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Sarah Regan
Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Writer

Sarah Regan is a Spirituality & Relationships Writer, as well as a registered yoga instructor. She received her bachelor's in broadcasting and mass communication from SUNY Oswego, and lives in Buffalo, New York.