Why You Should Practice Aftercare After Having ANY Kind Of Sex

Written by Gigi Engle
Gigi Engle is a sex coach, sexologist, and feminist writer. As a sex educator with the Alexander Institute and Pleasure Professional with O.school, she teaches a variety of classes centered around pleasure, sexual health, and confidence. She has her Bachelor's in both English and Journalism from Fordham University College at Lincoln Center, and her work has appeared in SELF, Elle, Glamour, and more.

Image by Michela Ravasio / Stocksy

Aftercare refers to the time we devote, post-sex or play, to cuddle, talk, and care for each other. You may think this is simply "what you do after sex," but it actually has important implications. In the kink community, aftercare is essential in order for both partners to feel at ease and ready to rejoin the real world. 

In my practice as a clinical sexologist, I'm a big proponent of all couples devoting time to post-euphoric aftercare so as to rekindle closeness, regardless of the play they engage in.

Aftercare makes for stronger emotional bonds.

Couples who practice aftercare will naturally develop closer, more intimate bonds with their partners than those who don't. After sex, we're particularly vulnerable. We're naked, we've (hopefully) just had an orgasm, and our bodies are awash in oxytocin and dopamine. We need to ensure that positive state of mind continues. "Everyone feels good when they know their partner cares for them, and what better way to show it than tending to them when they are in a vulnerable post-sex state of mind?" says licensed psychotherapist and couples therapist Pam Saffer, LMFT.

"Prioritizing time [for] aftercare provides space to improve emotional intimacy, sharing and validating positive emotions. It really encourages couples to share open communication and express love [and] kindness toward each other either verbally or through affectionate touch," adds Kristine D'Angelo, a certified sex coach and clinical sexologist.

It doesn't matter if you're friends with benefits, in a long-term relationship, a one-night-stand, or married; aftercare is still important. While it may seem odd to engage in aftercare with someone you're not seriously dating, it's still important. It's not about making someone fall in love with you or trying to make a more serious relationship out of something casual. It's about making sure everyone is cared for with respect and tenderness so that they can leave a sexual experience feeling good about themselves.

Take some time to connect with your partner and reflect on everything that happened in a positive, kind way. The kind of relationship you're in doesn't diminish the need for making sure everyone feels good about the sex that took place. 

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It helps relieve underlying sexual shame.

While sex is not shameful and should be enjoyed (safely) by one and all, it can sometimes bring up feelings of shame due to the sex-negative messages many of us faced growing up. While the logical mind tells us that sex is normal and healthy, our subconscious can store these shameful messages. After sex, after that delicious post-orgasmic high, your body can suddenly unearth the subconscious shame. This might be especially relevant if one or more parties was raised within a conservative or religious background

"Part of the point of aftercare is to diminish any post-sexual shame, which can be heightened by sex followed by goodbye, leaving a partner to feel you [didn't care] for them but only [wanted] sexual gratification," says Gail Saltz, M.D., associate professor of psychiatry at the New York–Presbyterian Hospital Weill-Cornell School of Medicine. "Women, in particular, have been socialized to feel that [sex for] sexual gratification only is a shameful act. It is, of course, not, but nonetheless, being cared for in some way afterward often mitigates those feelings of shame."

Aftercare helps to stave off the post-coital blues.

Have you ever felt like crying after sex? You know, when you have a truly amazing orgasm and then feel sad for no reason? This is called "post-coital dysphoria," or the post-sex blues. It's believed to come from the euphoric rush and sudden comedown that follows intense sexual pleasure. It is the brain's way of recalibrating. Research has shown that nearly half of men and women have experienced PCD at some point in their lives.

Aftercare is the salve that soothes these sad feelings. "Sometimes people can feel alienated from their partners after the euphoric feelings from sex wear off," Shaffer explains. "Aftercare routines can help them to feel close in a purposeful way."

Have an open and honest discussion about PCD and develop an aftercare routine that makes you feel safe and secure. You might want to cuddle, perhaps you want your partner to stroke your arm, or you might want to have a nice chat or a deeper conversation. "If you know there is something after sex that would make you feel better, then you need to speak up and ask for what you want. Your partner wants you to feel good, and anything they can do in aftercare needs to be communicated and shared with them," D'Angelo says. 

Sex is very fun, but it can be an emotionally fraught thing in addition to all the pleasures, so we need to take precautions to ensure that everyone walks away from the experience feeling positive and good about themselves. Whatever form of aftercare works for you is perfectly fine. Just be sure you have a discussion about it before any sexy time takes place. When it comes to sex, we all deserve to walk out the door afterward feeling emotionally whole and great about ourselves.

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