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Up Your Omega-3 Intake To Achieve Deep, Restful Sleep

Morgan Chamberlain
Author:
December 23, 2022
Morgan Chamberlain
mbg Supplement Editor
By Morgan Chamberlain
mbg Supplement Editor
Morgan Chamberlain is a supplement editor at mindbodygreen. She graduated from Syracuse University with a Bachelor of Science degree in magazine journalism and a minor in nutrition.
Woman sleeping on her side
Image by jamie grill atlas / Stocksy
December 23, 2022

According to the CDC, 35% of U.S. adults1 do not get the recommended amount of sleep (i.e., seven hours) each night. That's one in three American adults! 

With this shocking statistic, it's no wonder people are on the hunt for tools and tips that can help them get adequate shut-eye. Luckily, we've discovered one unexpected yet minor change in your diet can make a big difference in sleep health: upping your intake of omega-3s.

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Seafood for sleep?

Eating more omega-3-laden oily fish (think salmon, tuna, anchovies, sardines, mackerel, and herring) is associated with better sleep quality2

Unfortunately, fish isn't a staple food in the U.S. In fact, over 90% of Americans are failing to consume enough omega-3s. Simply put, Americans aren't eating enough fish to reap omega-3's sleep (and many additional) benefits.

Not to fear, you don't have to actually eat fish to get a good night's rest (although adding more oily fish to your diet certainly doesn't hurt!). Evidence shows that an omega-3 supplement rich in EPA and DHA is an effective strategy to support healthy omega-3 levels and whole-body health (including your sleep life3).*

How an omega-3 supplement promotes deep, restful sleep.

In a 2021 Nutrients study, researchers tested the effects of EPA- and DHA-rich omega-3 supplements4 on sleep quality in healthy adults with inadequate fish consumption. 

Compared to the placebo, participants that took DHA-rich fish oil saw a significant increase in sleep efficiency (the amount of time in bed spent sleeping) and a significant decrease in sleep latency (the amount of time taken to fall asleep). Participants that took EPA-rich fish oil saw a significant increase in sleep efficiency and reported feeling rested, energetic, and ready to perform. 

Overall, the study results showed that an omega-3 supplement (particularly, a fish oil rich in DHA and EPA) can have a beneficial effect on overall sleep quality in individuals that don't get enough oily fish in their diet (most of us).* 

In other words? If you don't eat fish on a regular basis, upping your EPA and DHA intake through supplementation is a fantastic way to ensure healthy omega-3 levels are established in your body, for overall health (including helping you fall asleep faster and get more restorative sleep with fewer disruptions).*

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The takeaway.

One out of three U.S. adults gets fewer hours of sleep than recommended and nine out of 10 Americans fail to consume adequate omega-3 fatty acids.

If you're like the majority of Americans and struggle to get enough oily fish on your plate throughout the week, consider taking a high-quality omega-3 supplement with clinically useful doses of EPA and DHA (like mindbodygreen's omega-3 potency+) to up your daily omega-3 intake and support healthy omega-3 levels.* One daily serving (two gelcaps) of omega-3 potency+ delivers the same amount of omega-3s as one whole serving of oily fish!†

If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking medications, consult with your doctor before starting a supplement routine. It is always optimal to consult with a health care provider when considering what supplements are right for you.† 1 serving (2 gelcaps) of omega-3 potency+ delivers 1,500 mg (1.5 g) of EPA + DHA. That’s equivalent to the omega-3s (EPA + DHA) provided in 1 serving of oily fish (anchovies).
Morgan Chamberlain
Morgan Chamberlain
mbg Supplement Editor

Morgan Chamberlain is a supplement editor at mindbodygreen. She graduated from Syracuse University with a Bachelor of Science degree in magazine journalism and a minor in nutrition. Chamberlain believes in taking small steps to improve your well-being—whether that means eating more plant-based foods, checking in with a therapist weekly, or spending quality time with your closest friends. When she isn’t typing away furiously at her keyboard, you can find her cooking in the kitchen, hanging outside, or doing a vinyasa flow.