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New Study Finds Link Between Vitamin D Deficiency & Premature Death

Stressed Woman
Image by Viktor Solomin / Stocksy
November 3, 2022

New research reveals that improving your vitamin D levels can be a matter of life or death.

A new population study from Annals of Internal Medicine shows mortality risk increases with vitamin D deficiency, which is defined as a 25(OH)D serum level of 20 ng/ml or lower. Considering 29% of U.S. adults1 are deficient in vitamin D, this new research is a bit alarming.

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The study also found an association between low vitamin D status and mortality from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory diseases. This means the 60% of U.S. adults2 living with at least one chronic disease and 40% that have two or more chronic diseases could be at even higher risk of mortality if they're also deficient in vitamin D.

How vitamin D status affects whole-body health.

Vitamin D doesn't just keep you alive; truly optimal levels can help you thrive. This essential vitamin is critical for myriad facets of well-being, including:

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How to reach & sustain vitamin D sufficiency.

Testing your vitamin D levels (either through your health care provider or with an at-home test) is an important step in reaching truly optimal 25(OH)D serum results (which is 50 ng/ml, for the record). 

Once you have your baseline level, taking a premium D3 supplement with an efficacious dose (i.e., 5,000 IU) daily can help you achieve and maintain sufficiency (see a roundup of mbg's top D3 supplement selections here). In doing so, you'll significantly reduce your risk of premature death.

The takeaway.

A recent study reveals low vitamin D levels are linked to premature death. To promote longevity and well-being, consider upping your vitamin D status with a high-quality D3 supplement.

If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking medications, consult with your doctor before starting a supplement routine. It is always optimal to consult with a health care provider when considering what supplements are right for you.
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Morgan Chamberlain
Morgan Chamberlain
mbg Supplement Editor

Morgan Chamberlain is a supplement editor at mindbodygreen. She graduated from Syracuse University with a Bachelor of Science degree in magazine journalism and a minor in nutrition. Chamberlain believes in taking small steps to improve your well-being—whether that means eating more plant-based foods, checking in with a therapist weekly, or spending quality time with your closest friends. When she isn’t typing away furiously at her keyboard, you can find her cooking in the kitchen, hanging outside, or doing a vinyasa flow.