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If Bone Broth Isn't For You, Try This Instead (It Takes Less Than A Minute)

Hannah Frye
Author:
November 30, 2022
Hannah Frye
mbg Assistant Beauty Editor
By Hannah Frye
mbg Assistant Beauty Editor
Hannah Frye is the Assistant Beauty Editor at mindbodygreen. She has a B.S. in journalism and a minor in women’s, gender, and queer studies from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Hannah has written across lifestyle sections including health, wellness, sustainability, personal development, and more.
Collagen-Powder
Image by Alessio Bogani / Stocksy
November 30, 2022

More and more people are focusing on ingestible skin care these days—no, we're not talking about eating your serums or eye creams. Instead, beauty fans are flocking toward edible skin-supporting ingredients like hyaluronic acid, ceramides, antioxidants, and, perhaps most notably, collagen.

Plenty of foods can support your body's natural production of collagen, like, say, bone broth. Yes, bone broth does contain a bioavailable form of skin-loving collagen, but not everyone has the desire (or the time) to sip on pure bone broth every day to check that box. Luckily, there's a worthy (and tasty) alternative.

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How collagen powder compares to bone broth. 

The substitute? Take a collagen supplement. There are plenty of them on the market, but not all forms are equally effective. Be sure to look for hydrolyzed collagen peptides when you're on the hunt, as this form is the most researched as of now.

Depending on which supplement you choose, you may even get a more potent dose of collagen compared to bone broth.

"Bone broth contains modest and variable doses of collagen (anywhere from 2 to 10 grams per cup)," mbg's vice president of scientific affairs Ashley Jordan Ferira, Ph.D., RDN, previously shared. So while bone broth does contain collagen, it's not always a consistent, effective dose.

A thoughtfully formulated collagen powder, however, contains 10 or more grams of collagen, Ferira says, making it a perhaps more reliable and potent option (like mbg's beauty & gut collagen+, which delivers 17.7 grams of collagen per scoop). 

The best part: It can fit into any recipe. Whether you use the unflavored powder to add a creamy consistency to your daily cup of joe or opt for a chocolate and nut butter smoothie, you'll surely enjoy this good-for-you habit. A yummy treat that simultaneously supports your skin—what's not to love?*

At the end of the day, this doesn't have to be a one-or-the-other scenario. You can love bone broth and collagen powder equally! "They each deliver a unique array of mammalian protein and other functional ingredients," Ferira explains. But if you don't have the time to warm up some broth, a supplement can help you reach consistent collagen goals.

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The takeaway. 

If bone broth isn't for you for whatever reason, a collagen supplement may be a worthy substitute. It's easy to whip up, and plenty of collagen supplements contain an even higher dose of collagen than bone broth. If you want to learn more about the benefits of adding this supplement to your daily routine, check out our full breakdown here.

If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking medications, consult with your doctor before starting a supplement routine. It is always optimal to consult with a health care provider when considering what supplements are right for you.
Hannah Frye
Hannah Frye
mbg Assistant Beauty Editor

Hannah Frye is the Assistant Beauty Editor at mindbodygreen. She has a B.S. in journalism and a minor in women’s, gender, and queer studies from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Hannah has written across lifestyle sections including health, wellness, sustainability, personal development, and more. She previously interned for Almost 30, a top-rated health and wellness podcast. In her current role, Hannah reports on the latest beauty trends, holistic skincare approaches, must-have makeup products, and inclusivity in the beauty industry. She currently lives in New York City.