70 Questions To Ask Your Friends In Any Type Of Situation

mbg Editorial Assistant By Abby Moore
mbg Editorial Assistant
Abby Moore is an Editorial Assistant at mindbodygreen. She earned a B.A. in Journalism from The University of Texas at Austin and has previously written for Tribeza magazine.
(Last Used: 2/17/21) best friends on a rooftop
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Whether you've been close to your friends for decades or you've just recently started spending time together, asking questions is one of the best ways to get to know each other more deeply.

While conventional small-talk questions (think What do you do for work? Where did you grow up? etc.) might be necessary at the start, asking thoughtful questions can foster a more intimate friendship, and asking lighthearted questions can keep the relationship playful—both of which are important traits in a lasting friendship. 

How conversations help deepen friendships.

"As human beings, one of our primary means of connection is through words—written and spoken. When done well, conversation involves a connection between people that is enhanced by subtle behaviors, such as facial expressions, hand gestures, allowing for reciprocity, and the opportunity to be both seen and heard," says Kristina Hallett, Ph.D., psychologist and author of Millennials' Guide to Relationships. If the conversation is one-sided, you may be dealing with a conversational narcissist.

As important as asking questions can be, it's equally important to make space for active listening. That's where reciprocity comes into play. "What we don't want to do is pepper someone with a zillion questions so they are feeling interrogated," Hallett says. "Engaging in conversation gives us the opportunity to develop rapport (the understanding of another's thoughts and feelings and the ability to communicate well)."

This process helps build community, trust, and an understanding of others. From a practical perspective, Hallett says, the more you get to know someone, the more likely you'll be to share personal details of your life, which allows you to be more authentic and vulnerable.

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Questions to get to know your friends better:

  • How are you, really? (A personal favorite of Hallett's.)
  • What's on your bucket list?
  • What's your favorite season, and why?
  • Do you have a favorite book you love to recommend?
  • Do you have a favorite movie you love to recommend?
  • If you won the lottery, what would you do with the earnings?
  • Would you pick your current career again, or would you do something different?
  • What are you interested in that most people haven't heard of or aren't into?
  • Who in your life never fails to make you laugh?
  • What's the first thing you do every morning?
  • What people have made you who you are today?
  • What do you think is your best quality?
  • What does happiness mean to you?
  • What does success mean to you?

Funny questions to ask your friends:

  • Who was your first crush, and where are they now?
  • If you were a dog, what kind would you be? 
  • What's your favorite GIF?
  • What is your go-to karaoke song?
  • If you were a cereal, which one would you be and why?
  • What's your favorite conspiracy theory?
  • If you could have any other name, what would it be?
  • What was your most embarrassing moment as a child that you can laugh about now?
  • What's your funniest first-date story?
  • What's the oddest recurring thought that you have?
  • Who is your celebrity crush?
  • What was your first email address?
  • What's your go-to dance move, and can I see it?
  • What's the most random or ridiculous piece of trivia you know, and how did you learn it?

Questions to ask a new friend:

  • Do you have any siblings?
  • Are you close with your family?
  • What made you decide to move here? (If they're new to the city.)
  • Dog person, cat person, or neither?
  • How do you spend most of your time outside of work?
  • Would you like to grab a coffee or go on a walk this week?
  • What's the last thing you watched that made you laugh?
  • Where is your favorite place to travel?
  • Where have you been wanting to travel but haven't had the chance to visit?
  • What is your love language?
  • What is your Enneagram or Myers-Briggs type?
  • What are your biggest pet peeves?
  • What's your absolute favorite way to spend a weekend?
  • Do you like celebrating your birthday, or do you dislike the attention? (Also, when is your birthday?)

Deep and thoughtful questions:

  • What qualities do you admire most in your parents?
  • What's one of your most cherished memories?
  • What's something you used to believe in that you don't anymore, and what changed?
  • Are you a religious or spiritual person? If so, what does that mean to you? If not, why not?
  • What is your favorite childhood memory?
  • Do you often find yourself worrying about the things you have no control over? 
  • How do you calm yourself down when you're feeling stressed?
  • How do you like to be comforted when you're sad?
  • Do you believe in soul mates? If so, do you think you've met yours?
  • When is the last time you felt deeply inspired, and why?
  • How do you want to be remembered/what would you want your eulogy to say?
  • Do you have a harsh inner critic?
  • How can I be a better friend to you?
  • What areas of your life would you like to grow in, and how can I help support that growth?

Personal and intimate questions:

  • Who's an older person in your life that you really look up to?
  • What's the deepest desire of your heart?
  • When is the last time you dreamed about your ex?
  • When is the last time you cried, and why?
  • Do you have any regrets in life or things you'd want to do over?
  • Is there anything you consider unforgivable, if so what is it?
  • Have you ever been in love? What was the person like?
  • What's your relationship with your parents like?
  • Have you ever hurt someone and deeply regretted it? Did you ever make amends?
  • Would you live with a partner before marriage? 
  • Which best describes your political beliefs: liberal/left, centrist, conservative/right, or other?
  • Do you enjoy discussing politics?
  • What kind of conversations make you uncomfortable?
  • Have I ever said or done anything that's offended you without realizing it?

The bottom line.

Communication is an important aspect of most relationships, including friendships. Asking open-ended questions and leaving room for listening, storytelling, and answering questions in return fosters healthy conversation and allows two people to get to know each other more deeply. The questions above are a great starting place.

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