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Ficus Audrey Care Tips For Beginners: How To Help Yours Thrive

Emma Loewe
Author:
July 8, 2020
Emma Loewe
mbg Sustainability + Health Director
By Emma Loewe
mbg Sustainability + Health Director
Emma Loewe is the Senior Sustainability Editor at mindbodygreen and the author of "Return to Nature: The New Science of How Natural Landscapes Restore Us."
July 8, 2020
Our editors have independently chosen the products listed on this page. If you purchase something mentioned in this article, we may earn a small commission.

The ficus Audrey, or Ficus benghalensis, is a unique woody plant with a light trunk and vibrant green leaves cut by light green veins. A cousin of the trendy fiddle-leaf fig (Ficus lyrata), the ficus Audrey is equally striking but slightly easier to care for.

Here, green thumbs weigh in on how to place, water, and maintain the Audrey's lush look in your space.

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The back story.

The ficus Audrey is native to India and Pakistan, and in the wild it can grow to be up to 100 feet tall and several acres wide. This is thanks to its unique growing strategy with roots that dominate other roots, forming a forest's worth of canopy in one single tree. The giant tree is considered sacred in India, and it's not uncommon to find temples perched underneath its expansive shade.

While your indoor variety won't grow to be quite as impressive, it can still get up to 10 feet tall. Ficus Audreys can cost anywhere from $30 to $300, depending on how far along they are in their growth.

Where to put it.

Knowing that the ficus Audrey thrives in warm, humid climates (these days it's also cultivated in parts of Florida) can give you a sense of the indoor growing conditions it needs. Maria Failla, the host of the Bloom & Grow Radio podcast, recommends placing yours in bright, indirect light; near an eastern- or northern-facing window would be great. Just make sure it isn't sitting in direct sunlight for hours on end in the afternoon. You should also keep yours away from doors, AC units, and open windows since it doesn't like dry or drafty areas and prefers humidity.

When cut, the ficus leaves can release harmful sap. As is the case with many potentially toxic houseplants, you'll want to monitor your ficus to make sure that your kids and pets don't bite into it. And be sure to wash your own hands after pruning the plant, just to be safe.

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How to water it.

The ficus Audrey may be less finicky about water than other large houseplants, but it still doesn't like to be soaked or left too dry. You'll want to let the first 1 to 2 inches of its topsoil dry out completely between waterings. Depending on the amount of sunlight yours gets, you'll probably have to give it a good watering once a week during growing season and once every other week during winter.

How do you know when it's time to water? "Stick your finger in the top 2 inches of soil," says Phoebe Cheong of Welcome To The Jungle Home. "If it's damp, don't water; if it's dry, that's a sign to water your plant." Keep pouring until you see water start to collect in your plant's tray, to make sure it's thoroughly hydrated.

How to feed it.

Fertilize your ficus Audrey once a month or so during the spring and summer months (unless it's brand-new, in which case it probably won't need the added nutrients). You can stop fertilizing come the first fall chill since that's when the plant starts to go into its dormancy phase. Be sure to dilute your fertilizer in water based on the package instructions so it isn't too intense for your plant.

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Other care tips.

Here are some other best practices for keeping your ficus Audrey happy and vibrant:

  • Since its leaves have a natural fuzzy layer, they do tend to collect dust, which can block sunlight. To give your ficus a good dusting, Failla recommends gently wiping its leaves down with a damp cloth.
  • After dusting, use a spray bottle to mist your ficus' leaves to mimic more humid conditions.
  • Cut back dead branches or leaves as you find them. Don't worry; regular pruning won't kill your plant. It'll help it grow stronger.
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Signs of distress:

  • Yellow leaves? You're likely overwatering your ficus. Remember: If the first few inches of soil are damp, leave it alone.
  • Spotted leaves? Puneet Sabharwal of horti, a plant subscription service, explains that Audreys are also prone to attacks from mealybugs and spider mites. If you notice yellow or brown spots form on your plant, he recommends using a diluted natural soap solution to spray the leaves, then use water to wash the soap off the ficus within two hours.
  • Dropping leaves? If your ficus' leaves start to fall off, it might not necessarily be a bad sign. Failla says that as the plant ages, some of its bottom leaves naturally begin to turn yellow and drop. However, if you notice your plant is losing lots of leaves at once, you might be overwatering or underwatering. If the leaves are forming crispy brown edges before falling, it's a sign of underwatering, says Cheong, so either move your plant to a less sunny area, increase humidity, or start watering more. (You might also consider putting your plant in the shower or bath for a more thorough soaking.)
  • Roots peeking out? It's time to move your ficus to a larger pot. Go one size up at a time to give its roots a little more room to spread out.

The bottom line.

The ficus Audrey is a special treelike houseplant that is native to Asia and loves humid, bright (but not too bright) conditions. It's easier to care for than other popular ficus varieties like the fiddle-leaf fig but still needs proper amounts of light, water, and fertilizer to thrive.

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Emma Loewe
Emma Loewe
mbg Sustainability + Health Director

Emma Loewe is the Sustainability Health Director at mindbodygreen and the author of Return to Nature: The New Science of How Natural Landscapes Restore Us. She is also the co-author of The Spirit Almanac: A Modern Guide To Ancient Self Care, which she wrote alongside Lindsay Kellner.

Emma received her B.A. in Environmental Science & Policy with a specialty in environmental communications from Duke University. In addition to penning over 1,000 articles on mbg, her work has appeared on Bloomberg News, Marie Claire, Bustle, and Forbes. She has covered everything from the water crisis in California to the rise of urban beekeeping to a group of doctors prescribing binaural beats for anxiety. She's spoken about the intersection of self-care and sustainability on podcasts and live events alongside environmental thought leaders like Marci Zaroff, Gay Browne, and Summer Rayne Oakes.