Advertisement
This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.
Close Banner
Advertisement
This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.

This Hearty Breakfast Is Perfect For Getting Your Fiber Fix — And It Can Be Made Sweet Or Savory

Sarah Regan
Author:
Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Editor
By Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Editor
Sarah Regan is a Spirituality & Relationships Editor, and a registered yoga instructor. She received her bachelor's in broadcasting and mass communication from SUNY Oswego, and lives in Buffalo, New York.
Woman preparing a healthy breakfast in the morning with an optimistic attitude and vibe
Image by Gabriela Cardona / Stocksy

As the days get shorter and temperatures creep lower here in the Northern Hemisphere, we're all busting out the pots and pans, eager to make our favorite comfort recipes. Warm cereals like oatmeal are a common standby in the U.S., but allow us to introduce you to millet, a grain that's been trusted in Ayurveda for centuries.

Here, an Ayurveda expert and neurologist explains why millet deserves a spot in your pantry, plus how to whip it into a delicious and nutritious breakfast.

Fall is a time for warming, easy-to-digest meals

As neurologist and Ayurveda expert Kulreet Chaudhary, M.D., tells mindbodygreen, there are three "doshas" or mind-body types in Ayurvedic medicine: Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. Each type tends to fall out of balance during particular times of year, and in the case of winter, it's the Kapha dosha that takes a hit.

"When the temperature starts getting cold and wet, the Kapha dosha is the one you need to keep in balance," Chaudhary explains, adding that Kapha types tend to have a larger build, slower digestion, and a tendency toward sinus congestion and weight gain.

To balance Kapha, you want foods that are the opposite of it, which Chaudhary says are warm (in temperature, but also warming through spices), light, and easy to digest. "Since most of us eat breakfast during the Kapha hours of the day (6 a.m. to 10 a.m.), it's particularly important to avoid Kapha-aggravating foods that are heavy, cold, difficult to digest, and loaded with processed sugar for breakfast," she adds.

As such, warm millet cereal is a "perfect match" for anyone with a Kapha dosha—or anyone looking for a healthy breakfast during the colder months—according to Chaudhary. "Millet is easy to digest, highly nutritious, gluten-free, and has a low glycemic index," she notes.

And with this recipe, which she recommends to her clients, the spices used can further boost digestion, whether you make it sweet or savory.

How to make an Ayurveda-inspired warm millet cereal:

What you'll need:

  • 1 cup millet
  • 1 tsp ghee
  • 1 tbsp sunflower seeds
  • ¼ tsp turmeric powder
  • ¼ tsp clove powder (for savory recipe, use cumin powder instead)
  • ¼ tsp cardamom powder (for savory recipe, use coriander powder instead)
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon powder (for savory recipe, use ginger powder instead)
  • 1½ - 2 cups of almond milk (depending on how thick you want it) 
  • 1 tsp of honey
  • Pinch of salt

Instructions:

  1. Melt the ghee in a pot, and roast the sesame seeds for about 1 minute.
  2. Add the turmeric, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, and millet into the pot, and stir together for 2 minutes.
  3. Mix in the almond milk, and cook for about 15 minutes; stir occasionally to keep the millet from sticking to the bottom of the pan.
  4. Leave to rest a few minutes so the cereal can thicken.
  5. Pour into a bowl, and once the cereal is comfortable to touch, drizzle with honey and serve warm.

The takeaway

Whether you're looking to get more variety in your breakfasts, balance a Kapha dosha, or simply find a use for the millet that's been sitting in your pantry, this recipe isn't one to miss. Save it for the next chilly morning, curl up with your warm bowl, and enjoy this ancient grain that's been a standby for centuries.

Sarah Regan author page.
Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Editor

Sarah Regan is a Spirituality & Relationships Editor, a registered yoga instructor, and an avid astrologer and tarot reader. She received her bachelor's in broadcasting and mass communication from State University of New York at Oswego, and lives in Buffalo, New York.