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A Simple & Effective Burpee Modification That Only Requires A Chair

Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Writer
By Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Writer
Sarah Regan is a Spirituality & Relationships Writer, and a registered yoga instructor. She received her bachelor's in broadcasting and mass communication from SUNY Oswego, and lives in Buffalo, New York.
Image by mbg Creative / mbg Creative
November 26, 2021

Burpees are infamous for getting your muscles burning and your heart rate up—and while they're an effective move, they may not exactly be beginner-friendly or suitable for every body. If you want to get some of the benefits of a burpee, with a move that's a bit simpler, enter the elevated burpee. Here's how to do it, as demonstrated by certified personal trainer Janeil Mason, M.S.

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How to do Elevated Burpees:

Image by mbg creative
  1. Grab a chair or elevated surface, and place it on one end of your mat.
  2. Bend over and place your hands on the surface, then jump your feet back to the other end of your mat.
  3. Reverse the movement, coming back to a standing position.
  4. Continue for 30 seconds.

Tips & modifications:

  • To make this a bit more challenging while still staying elevated, try adding a pushup as you plank before coming back up to stand.
  • You can also include a jump up to stand to incorporate more cardio.
  • To make your elevated burpee easier, you can step back to your plank rather than hopping back.
  • When you come back to stand, be sure to tuck your tailbone under and stand up tall.
  • Keep the core engaged throughout the entire sequence.
  • Start off slow as you work on increasing speed.

What are the benefits?

There are so many benefits to elevated burpees, especially if regular burpees are out of reach at the moment. Not only does this make it beginner-friendly, but it's also a much lower-impact exercise than your traditional burpee, making it gentler on your joints.

Expect to feel your arms, core, glutes, and legs working—so yes, this is a full-body move! And thanks to the consistent motion, it also counts as cardio.

And because this move only requires your own body weight and an elevated surface, you can do it pretty much anywhere.

The bottom line is, whether you're on a journey to regular burpees or you just want a quick and energetic move to try, elevated burpees are definitely a great addition to your next workout.

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Sarah Regan
Sarah Regan
mbg Spirituality & Relationships Writer

Sarah Regan is a Spirituality & Relationships Writer, as well as a registered yoga instructor. She received her bachelor's in broadcasting and mass communication from SUNY Oswego, and lives in Buffalo, New York.