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Cinnamon May Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Says 

Abby Moore
Editorial Operations Manager
By Abby Moore
Editorial Operations Manager
Abby Moore is an editorial operations manager at mindbodygreen. She earned a B.A. in Journalism from The University of Texas at Austin and has previously written for Tribeza magazine.
Image by Tatjana Zlatkovic / Stocksy
July 22, 2020

More than one in three adults in the U.S. have prediabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and about 84% aren't aware they have it.

When unmanaged, prediabetes can turn into type 2 diabetes and increases the risk of stroke or heart disease. New research published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society says adding cinnamon to the diet may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

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Why cinnamon may help.

Researchers from the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston analyzed 51 adults with prediabetes over the course of 12 weeks. The participants were either given cinnamon supplements or placebo pills three times a day. The supplements contained 300 mg of cinnamon extract and 200 mg of Cinnamomum burmannii powder (yes there are different types of cinnamon). In total, the 500 mg equaled less than 1 teaspoon.

After comparing the outcomes of the placebo group with the cinnamon group, researchers found that cinnamon lowered the risks of type 2 diabetes among participants. Along with stabilizing blood sugar levels, cinnamon also improved the body's response to carbohydrates.

"Our 12-week study showed beneficial effects of adding cinnamon to the diet on keeping blood sugar levels stable in participants with prediabetes," study author Giulio Romeo, M.D., said in a news release. "These findings provide the rationale for longer and larger studies to address if cinnamon can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes over time."

How to apply the study findings.

The 12-week study was too short to prove whether cinnamon can fully prevent the progression of type 2 diabetes, but the results were promising. So, next time you make overnight oats, peanut butter toast, or sweet potatoes, consider sprinkling cinnamon on top.

However it's added, cinnamon seems to be a safe (and delicious) way to help manage blood sugar levels—among other health benefits.

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Abby Moore
Abby Moore
Editorial Operations Manager

Abby Moore is an editorial operations manager at mindbodygreen. She earned a B.A. in Journalism from The University of Texas at Austin and has previously written for Tribeza magazine. She has covered topics ranging from regenerative agriculture to celebrity entrepreneurship. Moore worked on the copywriting and marketing team at Siete Family Foods before moving to New York.