Advertisement
This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.
Close Banner
Advertisement
This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.

Coffee May Reduce Your Risk For Developing IBS, Research Shows

Hannah Frye
Author:
December 11, 2023
Hannah Frye
Assistant Beauty & Health Editor
By Hannah Frye
Assistant Beauty & Health Editor
Hannah Frye is the Assistant Beauty Editor at mindbodygreen. She has a B.S. in journalism and a minor in women’s, gender, and queer studies from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Hannah has written across lifestyle sections including health, wellness, sustainability, personal development, and more.
 woman enjoys her early morning routine.
Image by McKinsey Jordan / Stocksy
December 11, 2023
We carefully vet all products and services featured on mindbodygreen using our commerce guidelines. Our selections are never influenced by the commissions earned from our links.

According to a U.S. nationwide survey, the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)1 is on the rise. The exact cause of IBS is unknown, though factors like bacteria, antibiotic use, and stress all seem to play a role in this uptick

It's safe to say that now is as good a time as any to keep IBS prevention top of mind. And according to new research, coffee may be one piece of the puzzle. 

Coffee drinkers are 16% less likely to develop IBS, according to a recent meta-analysis

A new meta-analysis on eight different studies and a total of 432,022 participants found that coffee drinkers are 16% less likely to develop IBS than people who do not drink coffee2—a surprising finding given coffee is typically framed as a no-no for stomach sensitivities.

The exact reason behind this correlation isn't yet clear, but hopefully, future studies can answer that question. However, these researchers suggest it may have to do with the many different plant compounds in coffee with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. 

What is IBS?

According to the National Health Service (NHS), "Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition that affects the digestive system. It causes symptoms like stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhea and constipation. These tend to come and go over time, and can last for days, weeks or months at a time."

Other studies included in the review demonstrate that substances in coffee can help maintain the integrity of the intestinal barrier, have positive effects on the gut microbiome, and aid in the maintenance of intestinal permeability and mobility—all of which are a step forward for preventing IBS. 

All of that said, coffee isn't necessarily given the green light once someone does develop IBS. 

"If you have IBS/IBD, coffee can aggravate your gut and exacerbate your symptoms," functional nutritionist Abigail King, M.S., CNS, previously told mindbodygreen.

It's no secret that coffee can act as a natural laxative because it increases colonic activity3, so proceed with caution if your bowels are already unstable. 

Even when it comes down to coffee for prevention, it's important to use beans rich in polyphenols and antioxidants and free from potentially harmful components like pesticides and mold (yes, it happens).

Remember that each person is different and the root cause of IBS is still largely unknown.

If you're having recurrent digestive complications or think you may have IBS, reach out to your physician for help. Again, it's a growing health concern, so you're not alone. 

The takeaway

A new study found that coffee drinkers are 16% less likely to develop IBS than people who do not drink coffee. However, those who do have IBS may not tolerate coffee as well, so the preventive benefit does not extend to treatment of any kind. For those who have a sensitive stomach as is but crave a cup of joe in the morning, there are steps you can take to ease the potential negative side effects—here are some helpful tips to get you started.

Watch Next

Enjoy some of our favorite clips from classes

Watch Next

Enjoy some of our favorite clips from classes

What Is Meditation?

Mindfulness/Spirituality | Light Watkins

Box Breathing

Mindfulness/Spirituality | Gwen Dittmar

What Breathwork Can Address

Mindfulness/Spirituality | Gwen Dittmar

The 8 Limbs of Yoga - What is Asana?

Yoga | Caley Alyssa

Two Standing Postures to Open Up Tight Hips

Yoga | Caley Alyssa

How Plants Can Optimize Athletic Performance

Nutrition | Rich Roll

What to Eat Before a Workout

Nutrition | Rich Roll

How Ayurveda Helps Us Navigate Modern Life

Nutrition | Sahara Rose

Messages About Love & Relationships

Love & Relationships | Esther Perel

Love Languages

Love & Relationships | Esther Perel

Related Videos (10)

What Is Meditation?

Box Breathing

What Breathwork Can Address

The 8 Limbs of Yoga - What is Asana?

Two Standing Postures to Open Up Tight Hips

How Plants Can Optimize Athletic Performance

What to Eat Before a Workout

How Ayurveda Helps Us Navigate Modern Life

Messages About Love & Relationships

Love Languages

Advertisement
This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.

More On This Topic

more Health
Advertisement
This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.
Advertisement
This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.