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This Black Bean Chili Is A One-Pot Wonder With A Surprising Ingredient

Ellie Krieger, R.D.
Dietitian & New York Times bestselling author
By Ellie Krieger, R.D.
Dietitian & New York Times bestselling author
Ellie Krieger, R.D., is a New York Times bestselling, James Beard Foundation and IACP award winning author of five cookbooks.
Image by Ellie Krieger
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October 18, 2019

In this hearty chili, the essence of orange—both juice and zest—brightens the deep, savory taste of the black beans and tomatoes, which are simmered with an earthy, smoky blend of spices including cumin, ancho chili powder, and a kick of cayenne.

Ancho chili powder is made from smoked poblano peppers—it has a mild heat level and subtle sweetness and adds a uniquely aromatic and robust flavor dimension. You can substitute regular chili powder for this recipe if need be—just add the cayenne judiciously, depending on how hot your chili powder is.

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This chili is packed with nutrients, including fiber, folate, iron, potassium, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin K. How's that for a one-pot meal?

Ancho Black Bean Chili With Orange Essence

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium-size onion, diced (about 1½ cups)
  • 1 large red bell pepper, seeded and diced (about 1 cup)
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon ancho chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1¼ teaspoons salt, plus more to taste
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper, plus more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 cups canned crushed tomatoes
  • 3 (15-ounce) cans low-sodium black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated orange zest, divided
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • ⅓ cup lightly packed fresh cilantro leaves
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Method:

  1. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and bell pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 minutes. Add the garlic, ancho chili powder, cumin, salt, oregano, cayenne, and tomato paste and cook, stirring, for 1 minute more.
  2. Add the crushed tomatoes, beans, 1 teaspoon of the orange zest, the honey, and ½ cup of water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to low, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the ingredients have melded, 20 minutes. Stir in the orange juice. Add additional water by the tablespoon if the chili is thicker than you'd like, and more salt and cayenne to taste.
  3. Serve each bowl garnished with a dollop of yogurt, cilantro leaves, and a pinch of the remaining orange zest. The chili will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days, or in the freezer for 3 months.
Recipe excerpted from Whole in One: Complete, Healthy Meals in a Single Pot, Sheet Pan, or Skillet by Ellie Krieger. Reprinted with permission from Hachette Book Group Inc., 2019.
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Ellie Krieger, R.D.
Ellie Krieger, R.D.
Dietitian & New York Times bestselling author

Ellie Krieger, R.D., is a New York Times bestselling, James Beard Foundation and IACP award winning author of five cookbooks. She's also the host and executive producer of the Public Television cooking series “Ellie’s Real Good Food,” and well known as the host of Food Network’s hit show “Healthy Appetite." Ellie is a weekly columnist for The Washington Post and she has been a columnist for Fine Cooking,Food Network magazine and USA Today. She speaks regularly at events around the country, appears on national television shows, such as Today, Good Morning America, and The Wendy Williams Show, and has been featured in magazines like Better Homes and Gardens, People, and Self.