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This Vegan Mashed Celery Root Is The New Cauliflower Mash

Image by Cameron Whitman / Stocksy
December 11, 2019
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Thanks to the magic of oat milk, a nondairy alternative to the real thing, I am able to enjoy starchy side dishes like this one that deliver on the comfort without bringing a world of hurt onto my joints. Unlike plain old potatoes, celery root (also called celeriac) supplies tons of earthy flavor while delivering on the fiber, vitamin, and antioxidant fronts1.

The oat milk provides the creamy consistency, and the nutritional yeast gives the mash a satisfying cheese-like nuttiness. The turmeric is a great anti-inflammatory bonus2, so I add it to the party.

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"Cheesy" Mashed Celery Root

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups unsweetened oat milk
  • 2 medium celery roots, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 1 tablespoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 medium russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • ¾ cup nutritional yeast
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Method:

  1. In a large saucepan, combine the oat milk, celery root, turmeric, nutmeg, a large pinch of salt, and ¼ teaspoon black pepper, and bring to a gentle simmer over medium-high heat. Cook until the celery root is easily pierced with a knife, about 25 minutes. Scoop out and reserve 1½ cups of the cooking liquid before draining.
  2. Transfer the celery root to a large bowl and press with a potato masher until smooth. Set aside.
  3. Place the potatoes in the saucepan, cover with cold water by a few inches, add a large pinch of salt, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cook, partially covered, until the potatoes are easily pierced with a knife, about 15 minutes. Drain, return the potatoes to the pan, and press with a potato masher until smooth.
  4. Return the mashed celery root to the pan with the mashed potatoes and add 1 cup of the reserved cooking liquid and the nutritional yeast. Stir to combine and season with a pinch of salt and a twist of black pepper. If the mixture appears a little dry, stir in the remaining cooking liquid. Serve warm.

Recipe courtesy of Fix It With Food. Copyright © 2019 by Michael Symon and Douglas Trattner. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House.

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Michael Symon
Michael Symon
Contributing writer

Michael Simon is a celebrity chef, restaurateur, and author. He shares his exuberant, approachable cooking style on the Food Network's Iron Chef, and Cooking Channel's "Burgers, Brew & ‘Que." He was also the former co-host on ABC’s "The Chew." Michael is also the author of four best-selling cookbooks.

Since being named a Best New Chef by Food & Wine magazine in 1998, Michael and his restaurants have been awarded numerous honors: in 2000 Gourmet magazine chose Lola as one of “America’s Best Restaurants;” in 2010, Michael was the first chef ever to host the annual Farm Aid benefit concert; Bon Appetit magazine included B Spot on their list of “Top 10 Best New Burger Joints;” B Spot’s Fat Doug burger won the People’s Choice award at the SoBe Wine & Food Festival. In 2009, Michael earned The James Beard Foundation Award for Best Chef: Great Lakes and the Detroit Free Press named Roast “Restaurant of the Year.”