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Big Fan Of Alt Milks? This Expert Wants You To Know Something About Emulsifiers 

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June 3, 2022
Clinical Nutritionist & mbg Class Instructor
By Kelly LeVeque
Clinical Nutritionist & mbg Class Instructor
Kelly LeVeque is a holistic nutritionist, wellness expert, and celebrity health coach based in Los Angeles, California. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California and completed her postgraduate clinical nutrition education through UCLA and UC Berkeley.
Image by charlotte may / pexels
June 3, 2022

Our gut microbiome influences digestion, nutrient absorption, vitamin synthesis, cardiovascular health, immune response, and mental health. And while lifestyle factors like sleep, exercise, fasting, and stress all cause changes to our microbiota, what we eat is by far the most influential and controllable lever we can pull in influencing our microbial health and, thus, our overall health.  

Unfortunately, there is no check and balance in our food system to assess how food and food additives interact with our microbiome. Foods are generally regarded as safe (AKA—GRAS status1) by the FDA based on their toxicity to us, not our microbiota. And while extensive research shows that the quantity and diversity of plant-based foods promote a healthy and robust microbiome, we are just beginning to understand the safety and impact that additives like emulsifiers in our alternative milks have on our microbes. Because so much is unknown, I turn to products that are taking a stance against using these unnecessary additives like MALK and their delicious plant-based milks. 

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Considering the popularity of plant-based living coinciding with an explosion in alternative food innovation, we have to ask: What implications do emulsifiers have on our health, and why do we need them? 

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MALK

Plant-based milks with no emulsifiers - just 3 simple ingredients.

What are emulsifiers?

Emulsifiers are stabilizers between fat and water. Keeping them bound together creates uniform consistency, improves mouthfeel, and extends the shelf life of processed foods. You'll find them in condiments like salad dressing, premade coffee, plant-based milks and yogurts, protein drinks and bars, and even frozen treats to prevent ice crystals. When you want plants to taste like meat, cheese, milk, and yogurt, these additives do the trick—but are they worth it? We're ingesting more emulsifiers than ever, but the research is suggesting we should steer clear. 

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What does research tell us about them? 

The publications on the harmful effects of dietary emulsifiers started in 2015, when a Nature article showed that dietary emulsifiers negatively affected the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome2. The study looked at relatively low concentrations of two commonly used emulsifiers, carboxymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80. It concluded that in just 12 weeks, these emulsifiers alter the microbiome, induce low-grade inflammation, and promote metabolic disease. Then, a 2019 study looked into mental health implications and concluded that dietary emulsifier consumption altered anxiety levels and social-related behaviors in mice3 showing an increase in anxiety-related behavior for male mice and a reduction in social behavior for female mice. 

Human studies in the last two years are echoing animal studies, indicating emulsifiers may have a direct impact on the human gut microbiota and an induction in epithelial inflammation. A 2021 study published in Microbiome looked at the impact of 20 emulsifiers on microbiota and concluded that the vast majority, 18 of the 20, alter gut microbiota in a manner expected to promote intestinal inflammation. Carrageenans and gums altered microbiota density and composition and increased the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules the most whereas lecithins had the least impact.

Even still, emerging evidence suggests emulsifiers are breaking down intestinal barrier function and increasing antigen exposure, increasing the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome. And while Crohn's patients have been encouraged to avoid emulsifiers in functional practice, a 2020 feasibility trial finally concluded that investigating the efficacy of a low emulsifier diet in Crohn's disease was warranted.

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The bottom line. 

The reality is gut dysbiosis is closely involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, and we cannot continue to purchase convenient and plant-based alternative products without opening our eyes to the negative impacts on our microbiota, and thus our health. I coach my clients to check for minimal ingredients, swap for alternatives without emulsifiers, and get used to the performance differences.

For many of my clients, that's coaching them to take stock of what's in their fridge and lower their consumption especially on everyday offenders. That can be as simple as making the swap to an emulsifier-free nut milk in their smoothie, like MALK—a plant-based milk made with just three simple ingredients and containing no gums, oils, fillers, or artificial anything. I know they aren't sacrificing taste, and they won't notice a difference in their smoothie. That said, if they splash it in their coffee without an emulsifier, they'll notice separation—but I have educated them to understand one rule: If it doesn't separate, it's not great. 

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Kelly LeVeque
Kelly LeVeque
Clinical Nutritionist & mbg Class Instructor

Kelly LeVeque is a holistic nutritionist, wellness expert, and celebrity health coach based in Los Angeles, California. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California and completed her postgraduate clinical nutrition education through UCLA and UC Berkeley. Be Well By Kelly grew out of LeVeque's lifelong passion for health, the science of nutrition and overall wellness. Guided by a practical and always optimistic approach, she helps clients improve their health, achieve their goals and develop sustainable habits to live a healthy and balanced life. She parlayed her passion for health, wellness, and nutrition into her first book, Body Love (Harper Collins) published June 2017.

LeVeque is passionate about the science of human nutrition. Driven by the desire to help her clients, and her own intellectual curiosity, she studies the latest research, evaluates competing theories and reads everything. Most importantly, she uses that knowledge to make individualized recommendations for her clients. She also loves to cook. LeVeque believes in real food, real ingredients and a clean diet. The Be Well kitchen is constantly buzzing, and loves creating tasty, clean, nutrient-dense recipes and dishes.

Before starting her consulting business, LeVeque worked in the medical field for Fortune 500 companies like J&J, Stryker, and Hologic, eventually moving into personalized medicine, offering tumor gene mapping and molecular subtyping to oncologists. She is a regular contributor for numerous health, wellness and lifestyle publications. LeVeque rounded out her education with a number of other certifications including being certified as a Health Coach through The Institute for Integrative Nutrition, her RYT-200 training though the American Yoga School, and NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer® (NSCA-CPT)® certification through the National Strength and Conditioning Association.