5 Things You Need To Know Today (July 5)

5 Things You Need To Know Today (July 5) Hero Image
Photo: Felix Hug

1. Are you a runner because of your DNA?

And can a genetic test reveal your specific athletic ability? According to a recent article—no, it can't. But a DNA test can provide information to guide training either towards power or endurance sessions. (The Guardian)

2. Marijuana may help Tourette's patients reduce involuntary tics and other symptoms.

In a retroactive study based in Canada, 19 patients who'd been using marijuana regularly for two years reported a drastic improvement in symptoms associated with Tourettes, including tics. This study has a number of limitations and more research is needed, but all patients reported clinically significant symptom relief. (PsyPost)

3. It's time to do something with those Facebook likes and comments.

You know those 100 "Happy Birthday!" comments you get every year? What do you think would happen if you messaged every single person back and asked about their life? One guy did, and discovered the true power of social connection. (Science of Us)

4. The starlet sea anemone is teaching scientists about human's ability to regenerate cells.

When cut into five small pieces the starlet sea anemone grows into five new, whole creatures. Humans can't do this because our cell types are static—a brain cell is a brain cell, and it will never be something else. The new research suggests this is because of a "gene lockdown loop," which tells cells not to morph into other types of cells. Understanding this genetic code could lead to a future where limbs and organs regenerate in humans.

5. An unexpected animal benefited from Dinosaurs' extinction.

According to scientists, when an asteroid hit earth billions of years ago—killing off dinosaurs—frogs seriously reaped the benefits. In fact, according to new research about 9 out of 10 frog species today evolved from lineages that survived the catastrophic event and thrived in the years after, proving (once again) that nature is amazing. (NPR)

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