6 Things You Need To Know Today (June 23)

Photo: Mee Productions

1. New research found that eating fish helps people with rheumatoid arthritis.

The more fish participants ate, the less swelling and pain they experienced. And while this study cannot determine cause and effect, it's another promising development in the science of food as medicine. (NYT)

2. NASA has no patience for pseudoscience.

Goop recently started promoting a product called "Body Vibes," which are stickers made of NASA space suit material that are supposed to rebalance the body's energy. But former chief scientists at NASA called B.S. on the product and its health claims, saying the stickers aren't made of the real material at all. (Gizmodo)

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3. Your yoga pants can save the environment.

Or they can help, at least. RumiX leggings are made from 100% recycled material, including discarded crab shells and spoiled cow's milk. “Our goal is to reduce waste in any way we can," the founder says. (Fast Company)

4. These cities are clearing up the facts on climate change.

Months ago, the Trump administration removed scientifically proven information on climate change and its effects from the EPA website, claiming that it needed to be "reviewed for accuracy." Now 14 cities across the country have taken a stand are are republishing the data on their own websites. (Grist)

5. Nike is getting ready to partner with Amazon.

It's been a big month for Amazon. First they bought Whole Foods for $13.7 billion, and now it looks like they're moving toward a wholesale partnership with Nike. This deal could generate between $300 million and $500 million in revenue for Nike. While this is good news for Amazon, it would be a big loss for other stores that currently carry Nike. (Racked)

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6. Dreaming might not have deep psychological symbolism after all.

New studies suggest it's the way our subconscious learns. We already know that our brains synthesize information while we're asleep. But continuing research suggests that REM sleep (the sleep state where we have the most vivid dreams), which we already know helps us remember things, actually relives past experiences. But why do they turn bizarre? The working theory is that our brain is combining new and old information in weird ways to reveal insights into how we might use that information in our waking lives. (NPR)

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