This $5 Avocado Oil Spray Makes It 100X Easier To Cook Healthy Food

This $5 Avocado Oil Spray Makes It 100X Easier To Cook Healthy Food Hero Image
Photo: @chosenfoods

As a cookbook author and food editor, I try a lot of products for my job. I'll sample sauces and fermented foods and pots and pans and powders that promise glowing skin and unicorn-level energy (I'm not quite sure how much it is, but they're among the least lethargic of the mythical creatures). While these products are occasionally delicious and often interesting, they very rarely actually change how I cook in my own kitchen. Like many of you, I'm a creature of routine. I start every day with a different variation of the same green smoothie and finish with five or six rotating dinner options. I know the brands I like, and I know the products I like and rarely have the energy or inclination to stray from them.

Until the Chosen Food Avocado Oil Spray came along. This spray is a total kitchen game-changer. I haven't used any spray products in my kitchen in years, because the products that come in sprays tend to be highly inflammatory vegetable oils and because the sprays themselves contain propellants to create that smooth fine mist. Instead, I use coconut oil or ghee. Both of these are solid at room temperature, which presents problems when, say, trying to evenly coat a pan of chopped vegetables in the middle of a New York winter. I'll also lean on avocado oil, but regardless of which of the three I choose, I use far more oil than I prefer. Instead of a light coating, I often spill out a few tablespoons, meaning I'm consuming more oil than I'd like (even healthy oils should be consumed in moderation)—not to mention wasting quite a bit of cash.

Certain oils are much better for cooking than others.

Photo: @chosenfoods

You want to pay attention to two things when you cook with fat: the health qualities of the original fat itself, and the way the fat changes when subjected to heat. Spray oils tend to be partially hydrogenated vegetable oils like canola, which have been shown in numerous studies to increase inflammation with typical household use. Olive oil is a seemingly healthier, slightly less common option but has a smoke point of 350 degrees, which is a far lower temperature than most stovetop or oven cooking takes place at. I prefer to stick with coconut oil, avocado oil, and ghee for cooking, as they're all less processed, less inflammatory, and have a fairly high smoke point (400 degrees or above).

Most spray oils contain chemical additives.

These include dimethylpolysiloxane, a type of silicone; diacetyl, which often lends that "butter" flavor to cooking sprays and has been linked to lung cancer; and propellants like butane, isobutane, and propane. While the jury is still out on the negative effects of consuming these, they tend to fall in the category of additives many people with nontoxic inclinations (myself included!) tend to avoid.

Enter avocado oil spray!

Each can contains just one ingredient: 100 percent pure avocado oil from Hass avocados. According to the company, the cans use a "unique, patented air pressure technology which eliminates the need for chemical propellants and other harmful ingredients." Because of avocado oil's high smoke point, the oil is safe to use up to 500 degrees, fitting most of my kitchen needs. Now, when I scramble eggs, I can do a fine mist of oil instead of a heaping spoonful of ghee. I can evenly coat my veggies for perfect taste and texture, nary a grease-bomb in site. At just $5, this can has earned itself a permanent place in my cabinet.

Is coconut oil bad for you? The AHA says yes, but doctors disagree. Plus, nine reasons you should eat avocados every day.


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