Whether you're searching for healthy summer treats for your kids or want to feel like a kid yourself, nothing beats the heat like an ice-cold popsicle on a humid day. This summer, pass up artificially colored and sweetened desserts from the grocery store freezer and make your own raw juice popsicles. They’re easy to whip up and a fun way to keep the whole family healthy, happy and hydrated through the dog days of summer.

Start by investing in some inexpensive popsicle molds. We like Tovolo's shooting star and rocket-shaped molds, which have a built-in drip guard to keep hands from getting sticky. Best of all, these molds are BPA-free.

The easiest and most hydrating popsicle is one made from fresh watermelons, which are 92% water and only 6% sugar. Just juice or blend one small seedless watermelon. A juicer will remove pulp and give you pure juice, while a blender will give you a thicker consistency. Either works for popsicles.

If you like, mix it up by tossing sliced grapes or cherries into each mold. Then pour the juice into the molds, attach the handles and freeze for around 8 hours.

Experiment with different flavors and textures. We like these combinations:
  • Orange or pineapple and banana, which results in a creamier pop.
  • Strawberry and watermelon.
  • Kiwi and honeydew melon, a hit with kids in their “slime green” phase
  • Beet and apple, which results in a fantastic purple color. Save this one for outdoors and watch your clothes, as beet juice can stain fabrics.
On a cleanse? Turn your morning green juice into a refreshing treat. We like adding mint to apple, lime and cucumber juice for an especially healthy popsicle.

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The Well Wisdom:
Pasteurization heats up juice to kill bacteria, but it also kills beneficial enzymes. That’s why fresh raw juice is so much more healthful than store-bought juice that has been sitting on shelves for weeks.

Freezing raw juice does not destroy enzymes the way that heat does; the vast majority of enzymes stay intact. Freezing also has little to no impact on vitamins and antioxidants in juice.

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