Mahmoud  Ghannoum, Ph.D.

Dr. Ghannoum is widely considered the leading microbiome researcher in the world. He lectures at many institutions, such as the National Institutes of Health, on the microbiome and his breakthrough research in the probiotic space. He is also the scientist who named the mycobiome. He is the founder of BIOHM,…

Dr. Ghannoum is widely considered the leading microbiome researcher in the world. He lectures at many institutions, such as the National Institutes of Health, on the microbiome and his breakthrough research in the probiotic space. He is also the scientist who named the mycobiome. He is the founder of BIOHM, the first company to engineer elegant products and tests that address the total microbiome of both bacteria and fungi, allowing consumers to maintain total digestive health.

After making the breakthrough discovery that bad bacteria and bad fungus work together to create digestive plaque (a discovery covered globally by outlets such as CBS News, Scientific American, Forbes and USA Today). During his career, he has published several books on fungus and over 400 peer-reviewed scientific papers. His work has been cited almost 18,000 times by other scientists. He has received over $25 million in funding for his research from the National Institutes of Health.

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Dr. Ghannoum is widely considered the leading microbiome researcher in the world. He lectures at many institutions, such as the National Institutes of Health, on the microbiome and his breakthrough research in the probiotic space. He is also the scientist who named the mycobiome. He is the founder of BIOHM,…

Dr. Ghannoum is widely considered the leading microbiome researcher in the world. He lectures at many institutions, such as the National Institutes of Health, on the microbiome and his breakthrough research in the probiotic space. He is also the scientist who named the mycobiome. He is the founder of BIOHM, the first company to engineer elegant products and tests that address the total microbiome of both bacteria and fungi, allowing consumers to maintain total digestive health.

After making the breakthrough discovery that bad bacteria and bad fungus work together to create digestive plaque (a discovery covered globally by outlets such as CBS News, Scientific American, Forbes and USA Today). During his career, he has published several books on fungus and over 400 peer-reviewed scientific papers. His work has been cited almost 18,000 times by other scientists. He has received over $25 million in funding for his research from the National Institutes of Health.

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