6 Things You Need To Know Today (June 22)

6 Things You Need To Know Today (June 22) Hero Image
Photo: Rob and Julia Campbell

1. This is your brain on depression.

Researchers analyzing neuroimages of the brain found that depression is associated with abnormal functioning of the medial prefrontal cortex, which is crucial in self-consciousness and self-related mental processes. While the results are compelling, it's too early to determine the cause and effect at play. (PsyPost)

2. Want to train like a triathlete? Meditate for 12 minutes.

According to a new study of college football players, athletes who meditate may be able to better endure the mental and physical demands of training, thus making them stronger (and happier!) performers. (NYT)

3. A yoga protocol targeting sufferers of back pain can be as safe and effective as physical therapy.

A new yoga protocol has been developed by researchers at Boston Medical Center with the input of yoga teachers, physical therapists, and doctors. Through a 23-point questionnaire, researchers from the Annals of Internal Medicine determined that the protocol was as effective in alleviating pain and increasing function as physical therapy. (NPR)

4. This sustainable dining scheme is kind of genius.

The Sustainable Restaurant Group compiles data on restaurants' environmental practices to empower eaters to make sustainable choices. It shares restaurant benchmarks with eaters (currently, those in Portland, Oregon) to incentivize them to choose a green restaurant for their next meal. (Fast Company)

5. If you don't know, now you know: Stay away from antibacterial products.

A coalition of 200 scientists and medical professionals have banned together to call for stricter limits on antibacterial chemicals in consumer products. These chemicals, such as triclosan and triclocarban, are still commonly added to products like shampoos, toothpastes, toys, and paints despite data that they are ineffective at killing germs and actually promote "super bacteria" that are resistant to treatment. (EWG)

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6. Are you a decision-making maximizer?

New research shows that decision-making maximizers, or people who take a long time to make a decision, tend to consider the future more than those who make decisions quickly and easily, which leads to positive outcomes more often. They're not happier, necessarily, but they tend to make brighter futures for themselves. (Science of Us)


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