6 Things You Need To Know Today (June 21)

6 Things You Need To Know Today (June 21) Hero Image
Photo: Studio Firma

1. Could animated cartoons be a real coping tool for people with generalized anxiety?

There's a micro-trend in the world of mental health, and it's comics and animated cartoons. Some doctors say that it's because cartoons are wildly creative, bringing light, attention, and a sense of communion to those who are suffering. (Huffington Post)

2. There might be lead in the baby food your little ones are eating.

Recent analysis has found lead in 20 percent of baby food samples—a higher percentage than other types of food. Fruits, vegetables, and cookies contained the highest percentage. (Time)

3. Kiss your period cramps goodbye with this trendy herb.

Ah, the power of plants. It's possible that, by next week, New York will pass legislation that allows women to use medical marijuana to treat period pain. While there's not a ton of documented evidence that it works yet, there's none that says it doesn't. (The Guardian)

4. Germs are ridiculously powerful.

If you're in the habit of sneezing freely, you may want to rethink that one. According to a new study, germs are airborne for a solid 45 minutes after a sneeze, and they can travel 12 feet after a cough and stay alive for an hour. So make sure to take those sick days, or at the very least, cover your mouth when you cough! (Daily Mail)

5. Obesity now kills more people than car crashes, terrorism, and Alzheimer's Disease combined.

A new study from the New England Journal of Medicine paints a startling picture of world health. Research shows that obesity contributed to 7% of deaths in 2015 and that large proportions of unhealthy food (not lack of exercise) is largely to blame. (New England Journal of Medicine)

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6. Are water births dangerous?

Increasing instances of legionnaire's disease among newborns has raised concerns about water birth. The bacterial infection is spread through contaminated water. Experts recommend women labor in water, but move to dry ground for the birth itself to minimize risks. (CNN)


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