Skinny People Shop at Whole Foods

Where do thin people go grocery shopping? They shop at Whole Foods Market according to a new study, which also suggests there may be an economic reason behind this phenomenon.
In the Seattle area, a region with an average obesity rate of about 20 percent, only about 4 percent of shoppers who filled their carts at Whole Foods Market stores were obese, compared with nearly 40 percent of shoppers at lower-priced Albertsons stores.

That’s likely because people willing to pay $6 for a pound of radicchio are more able to afford healthy diets than people stocking up on $1.88 packs of pizza rolls to feed their kids, the study’s lead author suggested. 

"If people wanted a diet to be cheap, they went to one supermarket," said Adam Drewnowski, a University of Washington epidemiology professor who studies obesity and social class. “If they wanted their diet to be healthy, they went to another supermarket and spent more."

So is this purely an economic issue or is there more to it? Jamelle Bouie has an interesting take, saying:
It’s not that healthier ingredients are absent or too expensive — even lower-priced supermarkets have plenty of fresh produce available — it’s that preparing those meals requires more time and energy than is available to most lower-income people. Cooking takes time, and after a long day of hard work in low-wage employment, parents want to relax, and the incredible ease of fast and processed food is a powerful lure...

That said, if there’s anything I’ve learned from watching my friends attempt to navigate the kitchen, it’s that cooking isn’t obvious. Unless you’re familiar with the basics of preparation and cooking, the act of taking a few ingredients — some cornmeal, a bushel of greens, an egg — and making a meal is mystifying.

Perhaps then it's an issue of both economics and education. Thankfully we have people like Jaime Oliver who are working to improve this situation.

What do you think?


image of Rachel Bilson via JustJared




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