New Study Links Processed Meats To Early Death

A new study of half a million people has found that eating too much processed meat can lead to an early death.

Researchers tracked people from ten European countries for an average of 13 years and found that those who ate the most processed meat were more likely to die from heart disease and cancer. 

The study recommends no more than 20 grams (less than one ounce) of processed meat a day. 

The Atlantic reports
For half a million people throughout ten European countries, a study in BMC Medicine found, consuming processed meat went along with other unhealthful lifestyle choices, such as eating few fruits and vegetables, being more likely to smoke and, for men, consuming large quantities of alcohol.

But because this sample size was so large, the researchers were able to isolate meat consumption from these other factors. When they did so, they found the association between processed meat and premature death became even stronger. They estimated that if people reduced their daily meat consumption to under 20 grams -- cutting sausage down to a matchbook-sized portion -- about 3 percent of premature deaths in a given year could be prevented.

That's 20 grams or fewer of bacon, sausage, hot dogs, sandwich meat, and basically any meat "product." Poultry and rabbit weren't found to be a problem.

Eating little or no red meat, like beef and pork, was actually associated with higher all-cause mortality than very moderate consumption, presumably because red meat does contain important vitamins and nutrients (protein, iron, zinc, vitamins A and B, essential fatty acids). This range, the authors also believe, most accurately reflects people who attempt to optimize their diet, whereas vegetarian diets may be poorly balanced. High consumption of red meat was associated with significantly increased mortality only before they controlled for lifestyle factors. 


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