A Simple Tip to Heal Burns

Anyone who has burned himself with an iron, a hot pan or oven knows that it can be very uncomfortable for up to several hours after the initial injury. The following technique will stop that painful, prolonged sting.

The first instinct we have when we get a burn is to run cold water over the burn. It seems intuitive, but the rules of hydrotherapy (applying hot and cold water to relieve pain) tell us that once an area of the body becomes cold, the circulatory system will flood blood to that area to re-heat it as soon as the cold is removed.

So, for as long as the burn is under the cold water, it feels fine. It's the second that you remove the cool water that the pain returns, as the blood rushes back to the burned area to warm it up. This increased blood flow to the burn is what causes the intensified pain and inflammation, even more so than the exposure to oxygen.

The next time you happen to get a minor burn, try rinsing the burn with warm water for 3 to 5 minutes. Keep in mind that even though the burn may initially hurt a little more under the hot water, the water is not hot enough to be truly burning you. Be patient.

The circulatory system's response to the warm water is to send blood away from the area being warmed, and back to the core of the body, thereby leaving less blood in the affected area. Less blood means less inflammation, which results in less pain.

When you finally remove the warm water from the burn, you'll notice that the intolerable sting does not come back with the fervor it would have, had you applied cold water.

I recommend that you cover the burn with coconut oil after rinsing, as it will both moisturize and protect the burn from infection. Then cover it with a sterilized bandage, and you'll be right as rain in no time.

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