A Powerful New Way to Understand Your Ego

For many years we have been presented with teachings and teachers that offer that the ego is a bad thing or an impediment on the path to greater spiritual awareness and understanding. We have been told that the ego needs to be fought, repressed and even destroyed in order to move to a greater state of happiness and possibility. The ego it seems has been singled out and focused on as one of the biggest problems in the advancement of ones “true” self.

Is this really true?

Might there be a new and much more powerful way of looking at the ego that eliminates the idea of resistance? After all, we also have learned that what you resist persists and that all things have purpose, so why put so much force and resistance against the actions and feelings that come forth as a result of our ego?

Repressing something never completely makes it go away but actually suppresses and hides the real core of the reason it manifested in the first place. Eventually, what has been repressed will surface again to make its truth known. This is the exact case with the ego and may be the reason that so many in the world that have worked from these teachings have had trouble moving to a new, more permanent, state of mind and being. It also may be the main reason their ego keeps creating what they don’t want while simultaneously keeping them from what they truly desire.

In my recently released book on self-awareness, titled I AM: The Power of Discovering Who You Really Are, I go into great depth explaining the exact purpose of the ego, and how understanding that your ego is always working FOR you can be a major breakthrough on the path to greater self-awareness and self-mastery. What you end up discovering is that your beliefs about who you are (I AM) form the script for your life. Consciously and unconsciously, they define what you believe you are capable of creating.

Your ego is like a dedicated actor or actress that sticks perfectly to the script. Its job is to confirm your script and make it “real” by creating the experience of it in the world. Therefore, you could say your beliefs are like the seeds that contain what you intend to “be” each day. Your ego is the mechanism—an automatic process that occurs from within you—that drives the actions you take that attempt to nurture these seeds into full experience and realization.

From Chapter 6 of I AM:

The ego attempts to confirm whatever and whoever you declare yourself to be, from “I AM depressed and in debt” to “I AM happy and free.” In order to accomplish the task of verifying your beliefs, your ego will use any event and way of interpreting the event it finds necessary. Whether or not you are in harmony with the truth of what is actually occurring in your life is irrelevant to the ego. All that matters is whether or not your ego has accomplished the job of confirming what you really believe to be true about yourself through your experience of it.

What is interesting is what happens to our ego and our state of mind when we cannot accomplish the verification or protection of what we believe to be true. This is when our energy shifts negatively, and our emotions become a big part of our experience as our ego uses all the power it can in the attempt to accomplish its task. This shows up in all sorts of different ways: we might yell at our significant other or kids, argue with others to convince them we are right, or cry when overwhelmed in a last ditch effort to attempt to make our world “right” as it relates to what we believe.

What we believe at the most fundamental level about who we are must be experienced as true, or our truth must change for our survival. For example, someone can “think” he or she is the greatest wife or husband in the world, but until he or she experiences “being” a great husband or wife, it will only remain a theory. The longer it remains a theory, the more an experience of the theory will be needed to feel secure with the thought. At this point, some feedback will be needed, even if it’s just a momentary hug. Likewise, someone can “think” he or she is a great athlete, but without an opportunity to experience “being” a great athlete, the thought becomes susceptible to doubt. They eventually will need to do something that validates the thought, “I AM a great athlete.” Incidentally, it is exactly why it is so hard for many of them to officially retire.

Many teachings on the path to peace offer that you must control or destroy your ego. This is not so. The ego is neither a good nor a bad aspect of your being, but rather the creative part of your mind that responds to your surroundings to protect the view that you have created of yourself: I AM. Your ego is not something you wrestle or fight. It is not something to be destroyed in order to find contentment and peace. The ego is simply something to understand.

When we look at our ego from this point of view, we see what an ally it really is to us, as it relates to what we are truly trying to create in life. There is no more resistance or fighting but simply a greater understanding of what is driving every aspect of our lives. The bridge between mind and matter becomes clear.

This new knowledge empowers us with a sense of clarity, and because of this, we are finally in a place where we hold the most power to make a new choice and change our story. After finally doing so, our ego will respond and work tirelessly on our behalf to make our new beliefs a reality… just like it has been doing for us every single day of our lives. However, this time we are much more aware and in charge of our story.

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