How to Improve Concentration with Yantra Meditation

There are many tools the Tantrikas developed to help yogis meditate. The yantras, or symbols of the chakras, are one of them. There are seven yantras that correspond with the seven chakras:
  1. A golden square at the base of your pelvic floor
  2. A silver crescent moon in your pelvic bowl
  3. A downward facing red triangle at your solar plexus, behind your navel
  4. A blue six-pointed star at your heart center
  5. A gray oval set in a white circle at your throat
  6. A violet beam of light at your third eye center
  7. A white thousand petal lotus flower at the crown of your head
The idea behind the use of such tools is to develop one-pointed focus (dharana), which can then become complete absorption in that on which you are concentrated (dhyana). Bliss, transcendence, silence of the mind, liberation, calm, and NOTHINGNESS, may occur beyond complete absorption. Through meditation the ancient yogis strove for the experience of NO-THING or Unmani Mudra, the no thought mind,.

How Can You Do This Technique?

1. Find a comfortable seat. This might require you to elevate yourself onto a blanket, a bolster, or a block. You might also need to sit against a wall or in a chair. Basically, choose a position that allows your spine to be tall and open so that you are comfortable for at least several minutes.

2. Once you assume your steady seat, close your eyes. Tune into your breath. Begin to visualize the first yantra, the golden square at the base of your pelvic floor. Continue to move up the center of your being, visualizing each yantra in its specified location. When you are done, see if your mind has quieted down--if you have more space between your thoughts -- and can be a witness to them. Then, see if you can let all of your thoughts go, relaxing and surrendering to the universal pool of energy. If you are having trouble getting rid of the whirlwinds of your mind, start the visualization of the yantras once again from the first to the seventh. Continue the repetition until your mind is tranquil.

Over time, if you practice this technique regularly, you will notice that you become more focused on the yantras, your breath, and less involved in your mind’s drama. You might feel more at peace, free, and you might even be lucky enough to move through bliss to Unmani Mudra, the no-thought mind.


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