6 Things You Need To Know Today

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1. We've got some bad news for mugs of hot chocolate and pies everywhere.

There might be a canned whipped cream shortage soon, due to a nitrous oxide shortage. It looks like we'll be making a fluffy cream cloud for desserts the old-fashioned way this year. (Washington Post)

2. Eco fashion gets un-crunchified.

Kindred Black, a two-year-old online retailer, has the cool sustainable look down and the site sets itself apart from the pack with its investment in originality. Whether that means emphasizing timeless design, utilizing small-scale and local production, or collaborating with artisan cooperatives in the developing world, this e-tailer is at the forefront of both looking and doing good. (Racked)

3. This is the healthiest state in the United States.

For the fifth year in a row, Hawaii takes the cake (er, salad) as the United Health Foundation's healthiest state in the United States. Massachusetts finished second followed by Connecticut, Minnesota, and Vermont, based on factors like community and environment, policy, and clinical care. (The Sacramento Bee)

4. Later school start times are good for teens.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine found that students slept longer when school start times were pushed back. Later start times were also associated with fewer car accidents, increased alertness, and more regular sleep patterns. (Science Daily)

5. Your brain might not be less teachable after childhood.

Research published in the journal Psychological Science shows that when trained in nonlinguistic tasks, participants from ages 11 to 33 improved over time. In fact, late adolescents and adults improved much more greatly than younger kids, with 16- to 18-year-olds almost doubling the improvement seen in younger participants. Looks like you really can teach an old dog new tricks. (Science of Us)

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6. Climate change is bad for the fish-and-chips industry.

Due to the warming of the Northern Sea, cod, flounder, and haddock—the fish traditionally used in fish and chips—are fleeing to cooler environments. (USA Today)


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