One of my favorite teachers gave me a book years ago. One of those books that kind of blows your mind and also leaves you questioning everything. I was living in Hawaii at the time and paddling canoe—immersed in the water daily. The book is called The Hidden Messages in Water by Masaru Emoto. This book suggests that the molecular structure of water changes depending on the energy around it or words spoken to it. This idea is based on Hado: "The intrinsic vibrational pattern at the atomic level in all matter. The smallest unit of energy. Its basis is the energy of human consciousness."

It's a fascinating little book. The science seemed simultaneously complicated and too simple. (Basically, freezing water after tuning it to different words or music and then observing it under a microscope and taking pictures of the molecules.) The pictures were convincing, and it just sort of intrinsically made sense. I started speaking to the ocean during paddling races. We won. I'm not saying it's because I was talking to the water. But who knows?

Flash-forward to just over a year ago, when I read this fun blog by Danielle Laporte where she tested the way words affect our physical and emotional well-being. She referenced Dr. Emoto's work and did an experiment talking to an apple. This was an experiment I could easily do at home (without needing a microscope to look at the molecular structure of something).

So, I got an apple. I quartered it. I put each quarter of the apple in a jar. I labeled those jars: "good," "bad," "sexy," and "complaint." Now, I know this sounds a little ridiculous, but I can be a little ridiculous sometimes—just roll with me!

This is where everyone asks about the logistics. It's just an experiment. You should experiment however feels good to you. There's something very satisfying about testing a hypothesis. Mine used one organic apple cut into four pieces and placed in four separate, closed jars. And then—yes, it gets weird—I spoke to each jar every day.

I told the good apple it was good, the bad apple it was bad, the sexy apple it was sexy, and I complained to complaint apple. I did this for 28 days.

The first day, I did good apple and sexy apple first and followed up with bad and complaint. I left the house shortly thereafter, and I felt horrible. I really felt like junk. I felt bad for saying mean things to an apple. So ridiculous. I decided from then on, I would start with complaint and bad and end with good and sexy.

When I had guests in town I had them talk to my apples too. This was fun and funny and led to some interesting conversations. One of my friends tried to tell bad apple it was good after she heard me talking smack to it. I couldn't have her messing with my data! But it's really like that—kind people feel bad saying mean things—even to fruit. Keep this in mind. Notice how you feel when/if you ever say not-so-kind things to your fruit or your animals or your friends.

It was also fun hearing people try to talk sexy to an apple, "Such beautiful curves and shiny skin."

If someone started to complain to me, I asked them to please save it for the apple. This was perhaps one of my favorite side effects of the project. Not only did I not have to listen to complaints, but whenever anyone had a complaint and I asked them to hold onto it to speak it to the apple when they got home, the complaint had typically lost its charge. If it was still there, it was almost a joke to revive it to share it with the apple. It made complaining seem so ridiculous. I experienced this myself and enjoyed the disintegration of complaint just from the lack of attention on it.

So it went like that for a month, and the results kind of speak for themselves.

Check it out:

So pay attention to the words you're putting out there into the world. Talk sexy to your lovers, and be kind to the people you care about. Realize when you speak nasty to someone or complain, you're contributing to the rotting of yourself and of them. Choose your words wisely. They have impact. Your energy affects the world around you. You are an intrinsic part of continuous creation. Your words create your world.


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