9 Things You Need To Know Today (November 11)

9 Things You Need To Know Today (November 11) Hero Image
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1. Want to calm your nervous system? It takes only a few breaths.

If you're looking to reduce stress, strengthen your immune system, and improve alertness, take a deep breath, pause, and exhale slowly to the count of five. Congratulations, you just practice controlled breathing—and it did wonders for your central nervous system. (NYT)

2. Suzy Goodwin ran a marathon in two hours and one minute—while pushing a triple stroller.

The mom of three 14-month-old triplets and wife to an active member of the military was set on holding the Guinness World Record for fastest marathon completed while pushing a triple stroller. She's submitted her videos, witness statements, and timing and race information to Guinness and is waiting for their approval. (People)

3. Clinton's choice of purple has many wondering at its significance.

The purple accenting Clinton's charcoal Ralph Lauren pantsuit has throughout history signified nobility, wealth, and power as well as magic, the supernatural, and spirituality. It may also be considered a color of mourning. In addition to white and green, it's a color the suffragists wore. But most strikingly, of course, it's the color you get when you combine red and blue. (Vogue)

4. A new HIV test housed on a USB stick could aid developing countries.

A new device can detect HIV in a single drop of blood and generate an electrical signal that can transmit to a computer. Monitoring the virus in patients can help improve treatment success rates, but the USB stick will need further testing before it is widely released. (LiveScience)

5. Soda taxes are in the future.

Residents in four different cities in California and Colorado voted to tax each ounce of all sugar-sweetened beverages in the area. Despite the American Beverage Association (who represents major soda brand companies) spending over $9.5 million on campaigns to oppose the tax, the measure was passed in an effort to fight the rise in global obesity. (NPR)

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6. No surprise here—women have better memories than men.

A new study finds that middle-aged women outperform age-matched men on all memory measures, though their cognitive abilities do decline slightly after menopause hits. (EurekAlert)

7. Is marijuana a miracle painkiller? After years of hurdles, scientists are finally allowed to do the research to find out (kind of).

Emily Lindley, a neurobiologist, has mapped out the first experiment comparing marijuana and opioids. In a carefully controlled environment, Lindley will test cannabis on 50 patients with chronic neck and back pains who use opioids but have self-medicated with pot as well. Patients will be given marijuana, opioids, a combination of both, or a placebo, and will then undergo testing to determine the side effects and effectiveness. (The Atlantic)

8. Now we know why smoking is terrible and causes all of the cancer.

Smokers who consume a pack a day suffer from 150 daily DNA mutations in the lungs and another 100 in the voice box. It's unclear how many, but the chain reaction continues in other organs like the liver and bladder. And apparently, they don't go away even when lung health is restored (yes, even social smokers, beware). Genetic mutations like these pave the way for cancer, so smoking is essentially a highway to illness. Ew. (The Guardian)

9. The culinary (and gluten-free) reawakening of Elisabeth Prueitt.

The self-described matriarch behind Tartine Bakery, considered among the best bakeries in the world, is expanding her repertoire of flavors and textures. This fall, Prueitt and her husband Chad Robertson opened Tartine Manufactory, a 5,000-square-foot bread factory that includes a pastry shop, restaurant, ice cream parlor and coffee shop. Prueitt has had adverse reactions to wheat for decades and realized she had to find another way to stay in pastry without ingesting flour. "This is the realization of a really long-term business idea that was sustainable for me personally.” (NYT)


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