The AstroTwins Explain Why Your Horoscope Hasn't Changed (Despite What NASA Says)

The AstroTwins Explain Why Your Horoscope Hasn't Changed (Despite What NASA Says) Hero Image

This week, the internet was sent into cosmic uproar over the news that NASA proposed switching up the astrology signs.

By claiming that the Earth's axis has shifted in the 3,000 years since the zodiac system was drawn up and there is actually a 13th sign in play, the agency sent astrologically inclined souls into a collective identity crisis. Scatterbrained Geminis struggled to grapple with how they could ever possibly be expected to take on a patient, practical Taurus demeanor. Ever-responsible Capricorns freaked over the news that they've actually possessed a Sagittarius sense of idealism all along.

Well we can all take a collective sigh of relief because, no, NASA has not just ruined astrology as we know it.

It turns out that, despite shifting constellations, zodiac signs always stay stagnant. Here's the AstroTwins' take on the planetary phenom:

Periodically, astronomers will announce “breaking news” that horoscopes aren’t accurate because the constellations have shifted. Or they will announce is a 13th zodiac sign, citing the constellation Ophiucus and claiming that the horoscope dates for Libra (and every other sign) have changed.

Here’s an interesting bit of clarification between astronomy and astrology. The actual constellations have shifted over the ages, but astrology follows a different system, which uses “artificial” constellations. Rather than following the movement of the visible stars, Western astrology is based on the apparent path of the Sun as seen from our vantage point on earth. Within that path, astrologers have carved out static zones, and we track the planetary movements against these. That is why zodiac sign dates remain the same even as the heavens keep shifting.

So there you have it. While Mercury in retrograde may be sending the rest of lives into a tailspin, zodiac signs are here to stay.

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