15 Things You Need To Know Today (June 20)

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1. This genius coffee grinder makes sure you have the freshest beans available.

A Wi-Fi-enabled coffee grinder can tell the good beans from the ones that are past their prime, then discards the duds. It also orders more when you're running low. If the future involves robots, let them be fresh coffee-making ones like this. (The Verge)

2. Elephants need prosthetics too. This guy is making them.

The Thai surgeon/inventor/prosthetics maker specializes in prosthetic legs and has made over 20,000 for dogs, cats, birds, and humans—not to mention Masha, a crippled elephant who had lost her right foreleg in an explosion. The designer said, “Animals don’t ask that we make legs for them, but we wanted to give Mosha one.” Mosha learned to walk with her prosthetic in 12 hours and has gone through nine prosthetic legs in the past six years. She's a growing girl, after all. (Vice)

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3. The American Medical Association wants to let teens sleep in.

The doctors' group adopted a new policy recommending that middle and high school classes not start until after 8:30 a.m. They called sleep deprivation in teens a growing public health issue and said delaying start times would help improve kids' overall well-being. (U.S. News & World Report)

4. Philadelphia just became the first major U.S. city to pass a soda tax.

The tax, which is 1.5 cents per ounce, will apply to non-100-percent-fruit drinks, flavored water, energy drinks, pre-sweetened coffee or tea, and nonalcoholic beverages used for mixing with alcoholic drinks. While many are hopeful that the historic move will encourage other cities to follow suit, the tax is already being met with legal challenges. (NPR)

5. Moms feel more judged than dads.

A new survey finds that while almost all parents often feel judged, mothers are much more likely to feel that way than fathers. Plus, while almost 85 percent of dads responded that they're a "really good parent," just 79 percent of moms said the same about themselves. (The Cut)

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6. A U.S. food bank is offering healthy choices.

And it's helping people in need who have diabetes. The most important thing for people with diabetes is to have stable access to food, and food banks can provide that. While some still rely on high-sodium canned goods, some programs like the one in Houston are providing a more whole-foods approach. (NYT)

7. Hit the gym four hours from now if you want to remember this tomorrow.

Researchers have long suspected that physical activity helps boost brain power and memory. But a new Dutch study finds that for optimal recall power, the best time to work out is four hours after learning something new. When it came to remembering new information two days later, exercising on a four-hour delay worked even better than exercising right away. (ScienceDaily)

8. The secret to happiness for millennial men might be...kids?

A new study from the Boston College Center for Work and Family shows that millennial dads have richer, more meaningful lives than single men of the same age and demographic. Looks like that Peter Pan complex could be hurting your happiness, guys. (CNN)

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9. Looks like socializing could be tiring even for extroverts.

A new study suggests that "extroverted behavior," while making people happier and less tired in the moment, resulted in fatigue three hours later—across the board. So, your social fatigue might not necessarily mean you're an introvert. (But it's OK if it does.) (The Atlantic)

10. More attention + less discipline = happier, wealthier kids.

Kids who grow up in "supportive" environments—whose parents give them attention but also trust them and give them independence—end up happier and more successful than those who don't, says a new Japanese study. Those with strict upbringings and lots of discipline, on the other hand, tend to report high salaries and academic achievement but lower levels of happiness. (ScienceDaily)

11. Norway is dreaming up a green future.

The country plans to go carbon neutral, meaning that it will take the same amount of carbon out of the atmosphere as it puts into it, by the year 2030. However, this may be easier said than done since Norway is one of the largest oil producers in the world. (Grist)

12. The Culinary Institute of America is on a plant-based diet.

The leading culinary school in the U.S. is teaming up with the Harvard School of Public Health to call on restaurants nationwide to add more greens to the menu. They want to change the fact that the word "protein" often goes hand in hand with the word "meat" and show diners that vegetarian meals can be hearty and satisfying. (TreeHugger)

13. Take a peek inside New York's first micro-apartments.

Carmel Place, the first "tiny apartment" complex to hit New York, opened its doors to residents this month. All of its units are less than 400 square feet, but this New York Times piece shows that's more than enough space to live comfortably. Looks like bigger isn't always better after all, and the minimalism trend is here to stay. (NYT)

14. Kids are thinking up out-of-this-world ways to recycle.

Ten-year-old Oliver Blaise and Leonard Gu just took home the gold at the world's largest youth science competition for an invention that reuses parts from the Hubble Spacecraft to form a machine that can get rid of space trash orbiting the planet. (Business Insider)

15. This new wearable tracks more than just your step count.

The Zentra bracelet tracks the standard stuff like heart rate and sleep quality as well as keeping tabs on more of the information that makes you you, like your skin temperature, blood pressure, and even social media accounts. It uses this data to pinpoint moments when you're feeling stressed out and to feed you some methods to help you calm down. (Elite Daily)

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