15 Things You Need To Know Today (April 12)

Photo: Rich Barnes / Getty

1. Carli Lloyd wrote an eye-opening piece on the pay gap between male and female athletes.

The impassioned missive from the soccer star describes in some detail the inequality faced by female soccer players in the U.S. Soccer League: "If I were a male soccer player who won a World Cup for the United States, my bonus would be $390,000. Because I am a female soccer player, the bonus I got for our World Cup victory last summer was $75,000." (NY Times)

2. This is how Silver Lake locals feel about the opening of Whole Foods' first 365 market.

Last week, the brand announced that the first-ever 365 by Whole Foods grocery store would debut in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles on May 25. We asked local business owners felt about its arrival—and the overall response was very positive. "This destination grocery store will certainly improve the patronization of local businesses by default and encourage community redevelopment in neighborhoods that need some love," said Tricia La Belle, owner of Bon Vivant Market & Cafe. (mindbodygreen)

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3. Parental support could make a major difference in the mental health of transgender children.

A new study published in Pediatrics shows a correlation between parental support and lower levels of anxiety and depression in transgendered children between the ages of 3 and 12. While not a direct link, it suggests that support from parents could be the difference between normal levels of depression and the extremely high rates typically found in children with gender identity disorder. (NPR)

4. Bad news: Your organic shampoo might have chemicals in it.

Foods labeled "organic" are staunchly regulated by the government, but beauty and home products ... not so much. Some popular companies have come under fire for organic-labeled products that actually contain chemicals like sodium lauryl sulfate. (CBS)

5. Global warming is changing the way the earth moves.

A new study found that the melting ice caps are altering the way weight is distributed on earth and causing the North Pole to wobble in a process called polar motion. While this shift is harmless, it's still pretty telling about how much humans are affecting the environment. (The Guardian)

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6. Marriage might help fight cancer.

A large new study finds that the risk of death among patients with cancer was 27 percent higher for unmarried men and 19 percent higher for unmarried women, compared to those who were married. The researchers suggest that it's thanks to the social and emotional support of marriage. (NY Times)

7. We may be able to stop MS in its tracks soon.

A new plant-derived drug can block the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). This new drug will be taken orally in contrast to the common method of frequent injections. About 2.5 million people are affected by MS worldwide, so this would change the lives of many. (Science Daily)

8. More than 8 million older Americans suffer from peripheral artery disease.

Half of these people do not know that they have the condition. PAD involves diseased or blocked arteries in the legs. Not seeking out treatment puts those affected at risk of a heart attack, stroke, or worse. (NY Times)

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9. Two authors from New Zealand are crowd-funding a fairy tale kids' book in which the main characters are gay.

The authors Adam Reynolds and Chaz Harris were inspired to create the book, targeting kids aged 5 to 10, by the desire "to tell the type of story I never got to see or read [myself] growing up. When we were looking for LGBTI fairytale picture­ books like ours ... [most] were quite literal and more focused on sexuality than the story. Our story just happens to feature two lead characters who are young men that meet and fall in love, nobody questions that." (BuzzFeed)

10. A shocking amount of China's water supply is contaminated.

Eighty percent of China's well water is contaminated with chemical runoff and has been deemed unsafe for drinking or bathing. (NY Times)

11. The world tiger population is on the rise for the first time in 100 years.

According to the most recent data, 3,890 tigers now exist in the wild, compared to 3,200 in 2010. This increase speaks to initiatives put in place following the 2010 Global Tiger Summit, where government officials representing the 13 countries across Southeast Asia that house wild tigers set the goal to double the population by 2022—the next "Year of the Tiger" in the Chinese zodiac. (mindbodygreen)

12. This high-end juice comes with a "free" side of weed.

A start-up called High Speed Delivery is trying to get around marijuana dealing laws by selling $150 juice that just happens to come with some pot. The government is probably not amused. (Fortune)

13. Gas-powered cars will soon be banned in the Netherlands.

A new law says that only electric cars will be available for sale in the country starting in 2025. Guess they should consider hopping in line for the new Tesla! (Fast CoExist)

14. The gap in life spans between the rich and poor is growing.

New research in JAMA found that the gap between the richest and poorest Americans increased from 2001 to 2014. Today, the top 1 percent earning men live 15 years longer than the poorest 1 percent, while the gap is 10 years for women. The rich tend to live longer no matter where they live, but the report found that geography did matter when it came to the life spans of lower-income Americans. Those who reside in expensive, well-educated large cities live significantly longer than their low-income peers in less affluent places. (NY Times)

15. Tennessee passes anti-LGBT counseling bill.

Tennessee legislators passed a bill that could jeopardize access to mental health treatment for LGBT individuals. The GOP-sponsored bill allows therapists and counselors to reject patients they feel would violate “sincerely held principles.” The bill will now go to Gov. Bill Haslam (R), who hasn’t yet indicated whether he will sign the bill into law. (Huff Post)

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