15 Things You Need To Know Today (April 5)

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1. It's officially time to stop fearing full-fat dairy.

For years, we've been advised to avoid whole milk and opt for low-fat varieties of dairy. But recently, research has suggested that not only might full fat not be harmful, but it could actually provide some benefits. In fact, a new study of 3,333 adults found that people who had higher levels of full-fat dairy in their blood had a 46 percent lower risk of diabetes than those with lower levels. (TIME)

2. Indiana women are calling the governor about their periods.

Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana recently signed an insane bill that would ban abortions motivated solely by objections to the fetus’s race, gender or disability, but also requires fetal remains to be cremated or buried, whether from an abortion or a miscarriage. So, one Indiana woman recently created the Facebook page Periods for Pence page, where she encourages others to call the governor's office to report their periods, since each one could "potentially be a miscarriage." The results have been amazing. (The Cut)

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3. People are pissed about Aerie's male body diversity joke.

After releasing a faux campaign celebrating male body diversity, Aerie is under fire for making a joke of it at all. While the brand maintains that "#AerieMan was not a prank but rather an opportunity for us to raise awareness about body positivity," the webosphere is taking a pretty unfavorable view. (Mic)

4. BMI tests for babies could help identify those at risk for obesity.

A new study finds that body mass index measurements taken as early as 6 months old can accurately predict which babies will be at risk for early childhood obesity. (The Telegraph)

5. Chipotle might be rolling out craft cocktails.

In addition to their margarita offerings, the Mexican chain is dabbling in smoky mezcal margaritas, sangria, and an exclusive beer. Alcohol-free options will include watermelon agua fresca and a hibiscus tea with rooibos and lemongrass. Right now you can only get these tipples in one Denver location, near the Chipotle headquarters. No word on when the rest of the country can get in on the fun. (Westword)

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6. Bike sharing seems to be a whole lot safer than personal biking.

Not a single person has died on a bike share bike in the U.S., and a new study examined why the program has so few accidents. The researchers believe that it's a combination of bike design, rider experience, helmet use, and city congestion. (Vox)

7. Erin Schrode could become the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.

The 24-year-old environmentalist has announced plans to run for a seat on the state government of California. If elected, she'll be the first congresswoman under the age of 30. (Cosmopolitan)

8. Is DEET safe for pregnant women?

Health officials are advising pregnant women in Zika-infected areas to use insect repellents with DEET in order to avoid getting bitten. (The Zika virus is strongly linked to birth defects.) While scientific evidence shows that small amounts of DEET are safe for pregnant women, the studies are limited, and many may be hesitant to use it. Still, most doctors conclude that it makes sense to protect yourself from Zika, which is already confirmed to be unsafe for pregnant women, unlike DEET. (NY Times)

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9. Read and Ride programs could be the next craze in schooling.

The program calls on kids to do their reading on stationary bikes—helping them get more exercise and potentially retain more information. A new version of the educational bikes generates energy from pedaling. (Fast CoExist)

10. The music your grandparents hated might help cure cancer.

A new study called “Thunderstruck”: Plasma-Polymer-Coated Porous Silicon Microparticles As a Controlled Drug Delivery System (quite the mouthful) explains that the "vibrations caused by rock music have been found to increase a drug’s therapeutic window by creating a Teflon-like coating over the microparticles used in drug delivery." (A Journal of Musical Things)

11. It's official: Fracking can contaminate drinking water.

Following years of speculation and investigation, scientists have discovered that fracking polluted groundwater in Wyoming with harmful chemicals like methanol. (Scientific American)

12. A promising cholesterol drug showed no actual effect on heart health.

This is bad news for many who have an intolerance to statins, as it was to be an alternative. The drug reduces levels of LDL cholesterol and more than doubles levels of HDL cholesterol, the good kind, which is linked to protection from heart disease. So much for high hopes. (NY Times)

13. Erin Heatherton opened up about her struggle to keep up with the Victoria's Secret image.

She said that she initially worked hard by eating healthy and exercising twice a day. Still, she was told to lose weight after her last two Victoria's Secret shows. The model got to the point that she was depressed because her body was resisting her even after working out hard and got to the point where she thought about not eating. Heatherton decided to be true to herself and others: "I realized I couldn't go out into the world—parading my body and myself in front of all these women who look up to me—and tell them that this is easy and simple and everyone can do this." (Motto)

14. Birth control is now available without a prescription in California.

California's new law, aiming to make birth control easier to access, lets women get pills, patches, or rings from a pharmacist after they complete a 20-question screening about their health. Washington and Oregon are the only other states that also offer this program. (The Cut)

15. Having depressed parents can negatively affect kids' grades.

A new Swedish study suggests that living with parents who suffer from depression can have a serious impact on children's health, behavior, and academic performance. (NPR)

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