Target & Barbie Are Teaming Up To Eliminate Beach Body Shame

We've said it before, and we'll say it again: A "beach body" is a body on a beach, and a "bikini body" is a body in a bikini. End of story.

That's the message behind Target's new swimwear campaign, promoted in partnership with Barbie.

It's March, which means the pressure constructed by society to "look good" on the beach is quickly approaching. And that's why Target has cast models of a variety of shapes and sizes for its latest swimsuit campaign, appropriately titled #NoFOMO. The name refers to the idea that with this range of swimsuits, no one will have FOMO ("fear of missing out") this summer.

And since Barbie recently released a new diverse line of dolls, why not have them model the retailer's new line of plus- and straight-size swimsuits, too?

But this shouldn't come as a surprise: Target has been doing good for some time now. Last summer, the company made headlines for launching a body-positive campaign similar to this one, which included fashion bloggers of many shapes and sizes, and even released a video of women talking honestly about their bodies. Last year, they also introduced their first plus-size male model.

Clearly, being relatable as a brand really resonates with people. Women have been proudly posting pictures of themselves in their swimsuits on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #NoFOMO:

Aside from becoming all-body-inclusive, Target has gone in a gender neutral direction. For instance, in the kids’ bedding area, signs read "girls" or "boys," and the same goes for the toy aisles, which also no longer use pink, blue, yellow or green on the shelf walls. It also recently launched an all-inclusive line of kids’ home décor products, Pillowfort, that aims to dispel traditional gender stereotypes—no sports bedding juxtaposed next to pony bedding.

You could say that, lately, Target has been hitting the bullseye. (Sorry.) But in all seriousness, they get it: the more inclusive, the better. No one should ever have to experience FOMO due to what they look like. Because when has segregation ever been a good idea?

(h/t Seventeen)

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