15 Things You Need To Know Today (March 3)

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1. A daily cup of tea may protect your heart.

A new study finds that even just one cup of tea per day was associated with a 35 percent decrease in the risk of a heart attack, compared to nondrinkers. The researchers aren't sure if it's a cause-and-effect relationship yet, but it could be thanks to flavonoids found in tea. (HealthDay)

2. You might want to consider picking up a midlife hobby.

Research has found that learning to juggle, swim, ride a bicycle, or snowboard in midlife could change and strengthen the brain in ways that crossword puzzles or marathon training won't. (NY Times)

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3. Caffeine lovers now have a new way to get their fix.

Chewable coffee cubes are now a thing. Two GO CUBES have as much caffeine as a cup of joe, and they also contain vitamins B6 and B12. (BuzzFeed)

4. The average American's commute just keeps getting longer.

According to a new study, the average commute in the U.S. is 26 minutes each way — the longest on record. And lengthy commutes affect more than just our road rage — they've been linked to higher rates of obesity and depression, too. (Grist)

5. Yet another frightening aspect of climate change comes to light.

Research shows that global warming is expanding snake habitats, which could increase risk of bites. (InsideClimate News)

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6. In Canada, it's cool to drop F-bombs in yoga class.

But only if you're in the new "Rage Yoga" class offered in Calgary, Alberta. It's Vinyasa yoga, at a slower pace and with a not-so-serious vibe. (UPI)

7. Ivy League football coaches just voted to ban tackling during regular season practices.

This in response to growing concern about football's impact on the brain and other injuries. (NY Times)

8. Complaining can be contagious.

And not only is it negative for those around you, it's also bad for your brain and health. (Inc.)

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9. Your job could be increasing your heart disease risk.

CDC researchers took a look at which professions are associated with the highest risk of heart disease and stroke and found workers who were 45 and older and in sales, office support, or food service jobs had the worst rates of smoking, sedentary behavior, poor diet, and high blood pressure. (CBS)

10. America's hottest chefs discuss the future of food.

Predictions include more healthy-ish Middle Eastern fare (hello, hummus!) and finding the sweet spot between sustainability and high-quality produce. (GQ)

11. We just got one step closer to solving this whole aging thing.

For the first time ever, scientists have identified a key metabolic enzyme in human cells that declines with age. (Science Daily)

12. Cheaper produce could be huge for our health.

In a pretty groundbreaking study, researchers found that reducing the cost of produce by as little as 10 percent could prevent 515,000 heart-related deaths and 675,000 heart attacks and strokes by 2035. (Time)

13. The MLB just made history by suspending an athlete over domestic violence allegations.

Yankees pitcher Aroldis Chapman was suspended for 30 games under the league’s new domestic violence policy even though he's not facing criminal charges. (BuzzFeed News)

14. A new type of "collaborative therapy" shows great promise in suicide prevention.

The new model involves patient-centered therapy sessions, followed by "personalized letters from their therapist [reminding] them of the coping strategies they devised together to prevent 'suicidal crises.'" The group who received this type of therapy showed an 80 percent reduction in risk of repeated suicide attempts. (Medical Daily)

15. Emojis might be getting a little more gender-friendly.

Under a new draft proposal to the Unicode Consortium, there would be more male, female and neutral gender options for many human-looking characters. Plus, customizing hair color to black, blond, brown, red and gray, as well as bald, would also be an option. (Washington Post)

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