9 Things You Need To Know Today (October 15)

1. Can this indie athleisure label compete with the big boys?

The latest indie brand to attract investor attention is Outdoor Voices, which announced yesterday that it’s raising $7 million in venture funding in a round led by General Catalyst. (BoF)

2. This woman is planning the first Native American birthing center.

A certified nurse midwife wants to create more birthing options for Native American families. (Cosmo)

3. Spring might start arriving three weeks earlier!

While this might sound like a good thing in the dead of winter, a recent study suggests that due to global warming, spring arriving earlier over the next century will have a serious impact on wildlife. (NBC News)

4. The placebo effect makes for better athletes.

Runners in a study improved their performance after being injected with what they were told was a legal form of a drug used for doping — but it was really just saltwater. (NYT)

5. New documentary tells the story of an MMA fighter with Down syndrome.

A new Guardian documentary follows Garrett Holeve, a 26-year-old MMA (mixed martial arts) fighter with Down syndrome, on his journey to compete in the sport he loves. About 125,000 people have signed his Change.org petition, calling on the Florida State Boxing Commission to allow him to fight in sanctioned matches. “I deserve and need an equal opportunity,” it reads. (The Guardian)

6. Coke and Pepsi are competing to invest in Chobani.

Reportedly the deal could value the Greek yogurt maker at as high as $3 billion. Yogurt is big business! (Reuters)

7. A look inside New York City's first underground park.

It’s not an urban sci-fi fantasy: Someone is actually building a leafy underground park below Delancey Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The Lowline is a plan to turn an abandoned trolley terminal there into a public green space, using special technology that pipes in sunlight beneath the street’s surface. (Bloomberg)

8. What a city would look like if it was designed for only bikes and not cars!

The more that bike lanes multiply in cities, from New York to São Paulo, the more people ride. Over the past decade, bike commuting in the U.S. has grown 62 percent. But it's still a tiny fraction of overall transportation. In order to really get people out of cars, a group of Australian designers thinks we need to fully redesign cities — including the way we make buildings. (Fast Co. Exist)

9. I am training for a marathon, so why am I getting fat?

"I ran 6 miles this morning, I’ll run 5 tomorrow, and on Saturday morning I’ll run 20. I’m running the New York City Marathon next month, and this training schedule, by the way, is about as chill as marathon training schedules ever get. Still, it’s a lot of miles. And so you would think all of this running must come with the happy side effect of some substantial weight loss, wouldn’t you? I would, too, and yet this is not at all what has happened." — Melissa Dahl (Science of Us)

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