A Cooling DIY Treatment If You Got A Little Too Much Sun

With vacation season in full swing, many are battling the first or second (or third ...) sunburn of the season. Those of us who've been kissed by the sun a little more than we'd like know how that skin sometimes feels hot to the touch, itchy and just generally uncomfortable.

While oils and lotions are great for healing the skin, both act as protective barriers that hold heat in. Instead, you'll want to reach first for a cooling spray. By using an after-sun spray before oil or lotion, you draw the heat out, which is the first step to mending sun-meets-skin snafus.

So the next time you have a little too much fun in the sun, try this after-sun spray for the relief your skin needs.

Cooling After-Sun Spray

Ingredients

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  • 1 oz pure aloe vera gel
  • 10 drops lavender essential oil*
  • 5 drops frankincense essential oil*
  • 10 drops peppermint essential oil*
  • 2 oz witch hazel
  • 2 oz apple cider vinegar

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a small spray bottle. Shake well and store in refrigerator to intensify the cooling effect. After a day in the sun, spritz your skin to soothe and moisturize. This tonic should keep for up to one month in the fridge.

Here's the rundown on how each ingredient will benefit your post-sun skin:

  • Aloe vera gal: A powerhouse soother and healer
  • Lavender: This essential oil is analgesic, meaning it'll help relieve pain and regenerate cell tissue.
  • Frankincense: Promotes cell regeneration and provides pain relief
  • Peppermint: Antibacterial and antiseptic, plus it'll help cool skin
  • Witch hazel: Its anti-inflammatory powers will aid skin in healing
  • Apple cider vinegar: A class remedy to stop the sting of the burn

*While therapeutic essential oils can play a huge role in supporting your skins health, please ensure that you that you are using quality essential oils on your skin. If you're unsure of the quality of your essential oil, please don't use it on sunburned skin, as synthetic chemicals can make a burn worse.

Photo Credit: Stocksy


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