Your Pain Is Real. Here's How To Deal If Your Doctor Doesn't Believe You

“It’s all in your head,” is what the doctor basically said to me. He couldn’t explain my symptoms. He didn’t have a diagnosis. He told me I was making it worse by worrying about it.

Many people have been in the same position as me, dealing with chronic pain, and they've been told that their symptoms are “in their head.” It's a line that highly skilled professionals use as a way to throw their hands up and admit defeat.

But what if hearing “it’s all in your head” was your saving grace? What if instead of resisting that idea, or taking it as a total insult, you could be grateful and then go do something about it?

Here are two ways to look at your pain:

1. Emotions have physical side effects, and these could be showing up for you as pain.

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John F. Barnes, the founder of JFB Myofascial Release, has taught us that every emotion has a physiological manifestation in the body. Emotions cause the release of certain chemicals in the body. An overload or constant stream of these chemicals over months or years can burn you out and can cause dysfunction, pain and disease.

2. If the pain is really in your head, you can do something about it.

In our fast-paced world, no one has time to feel pain, be sick or injured. We don’t slow down long enough to really understand what our body is saying, or sometimes, screaming to us. That is a problem.

Hearing “it’s all in your head” should leave you excited, not hopeless. There are so many wonderful ways we can access authentic healing, healing that integrates mind, body and soul in a way that leaves you healthy and happy. Are you ready to address pain and disease in a way that is less invasive and more holistic?

Here are five steps you can take on the path toward authentic healing:

1. Wake up.

Practice awareness in all of its forms. Watch your thoughts, feelings, emotions and behavior. Get curious about what those things are doing to your body. You can start with meditation, breath work or body-awareness exercises.

2. Start talking to people who have tried holistic approaches to pain.

Find people on this kind of journey and listen to what they have tried and what has been successful. You will begin to get ideas about healing modalities you might want to try.

3. Look at your own shit.

Healing means you have to face the tough stuff. You may not realize you have stuff to heal, but if you’re reading this, you have a clue. Start practicing awareness every chance you get. See what your daily feelings, emotions and attitudes are. Are they generally negative or positive? Stay awake and use everything as an opportunity for awareness and change.

4. Try an alternative healing modality.

I’ve used acupuncture, JFB Myofascial Release, Emotional Freedom Technique, Craniosacral Therapy and many others to successfully get at the stuff that creates pain and illness. I’ve also created practices of self treatment, because I can’t always afford to go to healers every month. Breathwork, therapeutic writing and body-awareness meditation are my regular healing practices and serve to keep me in an aware, healing state whenever I need it.

5. Do more of what you love.

What does this have to do with healing? More than you think. When you dive head first into a healing journey you realize what you do with your life matters to your health. Doing things that make you unhappy, create negative feelings and emotions will create pain and disease in your body. So do more of what you love, and begin to create the love, joy and bliss you need for ultimate health and happiness.

Tell me here in the comments what your questions are about health and healing. What are your biggest struggles when it comes to doing the things you know you need to do to get healthier?

Photo Credit: Shutterstock


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