Which Of These Women Should Be The New Face Of The $20 Bill?

Which Of These Women Should Be The New Face Of The $20 Bill? Hero Image

The men featured on current U.S. bills have not changed since The Great Depression in 1929. Let that sink in for a moment. Nineteen twenty-nine.

Quick reminder: It's 2015. It's time to have a woman — or, really, anyone other than a white male — on our paper currency.

Women On 20s (or W20), the group pushing for a woman to replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill, has narrowed it down to a final four: Eleanor Roosevelt, Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and Wilma Mankiller. They were selected by more than 250,000 voters in an online poll from a field of 15 American female history-makers (including suffragists Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton).

W20 is lobbying the President to put one of these women on the $20 bill by 2020, the 100th anniversary off the enactment of the 19th amendment, which granted women the right to vote.

How perfect would it be if Mankiller, the first female chief of the Cherokee Nation, took out Jackson? The slave-owning seventh U.S president signed the infamous Indian Removal Act of 1830, which moved several tribes to territory that now comprises Oklahoma (where it just so happens Mankiller was born and lived until her death in 2010). During this forced relocation, which became known as "The Trail of Tears, more than 4,000 Cherokees died.

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Bumping Jackson off the bill wouldn't necessarily be justice, per se, but at least it's something.

"We believe this simple, symbolic and long-overdue change could be an important stepping stone for other initiatives promoting gender equality," the group says on its website. "Our money does say something about us, about what we value."

Meanwhile, the $10 bill — which features Alexander Hamilton — is officially headed for a redesign. The Treasury Department announced that a new version is set to enter circulation in 2020. But it's not the face that's changing; it's the feel of it. The bill will be the first to have a raised "tactile feature," making it easier for people who are blind to identify the cash.

But maybe, because the rest of the bills will inevitably encounter the same fate, it will be easier to get one of these women on the $20 bill at the same time. All the President has to do is ask.

Who would you like to see in your wallet? Cast your vote here. We're excited to see the results.

And here's a video, from W20, of children searching for a woman's face in a container full of money. Spoiler alert: They won't find one.



"Girls are just as important as boys, oh my gosh!" one girl shouts, in (rightful) frustration.

(h/t CNN)

Screengrab via Women on 20s/YouTube


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