Lane Bryant's #ImNoAngel Campaign Jabs Victoria's Secret

It isn't exactly the most original of ideas — as both Dove and Dear Kate already parodied Victoria's Secret's "A Perfect Body" campaign — but I guess it's the hit that keeps on hitting. Plus-size retailer Lane Bryant has just launched a new ad campaign called #ImNoAngel to promote its Cacique lingerie line, celebrate body diversity, and, of course, take a swing at its winged competitor.

At the end of last year, Victoria's Secret faced an onslaught of backlash for the aforementioned campaign which included an image of a row of models with a pretty uniform body type. A petition on Change.org and an outpouring of support for the petition on social media (with the hashtag #iamperfect) forced the company to change the slogan to "A Body For Every Body."

Lane Bryant has decided not to let Victoria's Secret live this down.

In a commercial posted on YouTube, a group of plus-size models show off the new line of bras and underwear while saying things like "How boring would it be if we were all the same?" and "It's all about how you feel." As the models strut their stuff confidently, the message is clear: "Sexy is defined by EVERY woman, not SOME."

Here's the video:

"Our '#ImNoAngel' campaign is designed to empower ALL women to love every part of herself," Chief Executive Officer Linda Heasley said in a statement. "Lane Bryant firmly believes that she is sexy and we want to encourage her to confidently show it, in her own way."

And while there's clearly so much more work to be done to make body-positivity a norm, I'm not sure how helpful these types of campaigns are anymore. Countless companies are trying to tap into this market — because the message is so shareable. But, unfortunately, it's starting to lose its impact.

Lane Bryant's mission was already promoting the idea that plus-size is sexy — and I applaud them for that. But did they really need to jump on this bandwagon alongside companies who might not actually care about this cause?

The campaign may be helping themselves — as it's already gone viral — but I'm not sure how good it is for the body-positive movement as a whole. Maybe the fact that these women exude sexiness through their blatant confidence is, really, enough.

What do you think?

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