How To Get Started Teaching Private Yoga Lessons

So many yoga teachers are attracted to teaching private yoga lessons — and for good reason! Private yoga sessions allow yoga teachers to deepen their instruction and the art of designing truly customizable practices for their clients. They also help develop a skill set that differs from group-led classes, and enhance the possibility of teachers reaching more students and growing their bottom line. The best part, though, is being able to deliver transformative one-on-one sessions and connect with yogis in a profound way.

There are so many benefits yogis and yoga teachers can derive from working on a one-on-one basis, but still, one of the most common questions I hear from my mentor clients, in social media circles for yoga teachers, and in private conversations with new and seasoned yoga teachers is, "How do I get started teaching private yoga sessions?"

Like all things new, there can be a learning curve when setting out to teach truly remarkable one-on-one sessions. You’ll find the three steps below are great starting points and wonderful topics to revisit as you are developing your private sessions. Before you read on, the best piece of advice is to just start with one person, one private lesson, and use each opportunity as a point to grow your offering and your business.

1. Figure out who you are serving.

It’s an honorable thought to think that you can help everyone (most yoga teachers have had this thought more than once), but the truth is, you just can’t.

Get clear about your who. Who are you trained to work with? Who do you enjoy working with? What types of people, with what types of problems are you jazzed to work with? The more specific you can get about who you should be serving, the easier it is to speak to them and market to them.

Your call-to-action step: Sit down and come up with some adjectives that describe your dream private client. Give yourself some time to really mull over the question and let it evolve. Once you have some buzz words, think more about who this person is — what they like, where they hang out, what problem they are suffering from that you can solve.

2. Come up with a system for success.

Systems lead to success. One-on-one sessions vary greatly from lesson to lesson and person to person, but you can create a system for before, during, and after that allow you to be professional and consistent and a master of your time.

Begin to outline the steps you take before you meet a new client, while you are with your client, and the things you do after and how you follow-up. These steps are the keys to delivering an excellent offering and can take the stress out of what to do when.

Your call-to-action step: Start your lists small — get a few ideas of things you’d like to do before, during, or after your sessions and jot them down. Think back to the steps you’ve seen others take or of the things you’ve had come up if you’ve taught a few private yoga sessions. This too will evolve as you, your business, and your teachings do.

3. Invite your perfect-fit clients to join you.

You're probably already teaching yoga in some capacity. And it’s likely that your dream one-on-one client is represented in your current student demographic (these people are gravitated toward your message, after all!). What better way to let them know of your new private session offerings than to invite them yourself!

Your call-to-action step: Think about your current students and their needs and then approach them individually to discuss one-on-one sessions. You don’t need to be slimy or sales-pitchy, just tell them the truth — you have a valuable offering that you think they could benefit from immensely, and you’d love to introduce them to it.

There is an art, a science, and a unique skill set to teaching private yoga, but with a strong foundation in place, an eager and can-do attitude, and an awareness of what it takes to deliver potent and professional private lessons as part of a sustainable yoga teaching business — you can get started.

Yoga teachers, weigh in: what was the hardest part when you started teaching private yoga sessions? If you're in the before stage, please share: what is the number one roadblock in launching your private yoga lesson offerings to the masses?

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