The 10 Healthiest (And Least Healthy) Counties In The U.S.

In the wake of the Gallup-Healthways Community Well-Being Rankings, which listed the best and worst cities for overall well-being, we bring you the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's County Health Rankings, which takes a deep dive into several health and wellness criteria to measure how different counties in the United States stack up against each other.

What we've included below are the rankings for counties reporting the lowest percentage of fair or poor health; in other words, which counties' residents feel like they're in good health, and which feel like they're in bad health? While this is a subjective measure that can be influenced by a wide range of variables, it's also convenient because it gives a quick snapshot of how people actually feel, rather than, say, how many trips to the doctor they've taken in a given year.

The Washington Post has a good overview of other variables measured by the survey; for example, if you're looking to live in a state with low levels of air pollution, head to California and steer well clear of Tennessee. Obesity rates are particularly high in Mississippi, and low in Colorado.

Here are 10 best and 10 worst U.S. counties for percentage of residents reporting fair or poor health.

Counties reporting the lowest percentage of fair or poor health:

1. Blaine (Nebraska — 4%)

2. Cheyenne (Kansas — 5%)

3. Mitchell (Iowa — 5%)

4. Smith (Kansas — 5%)

5. Clay (South Dakota — 5%)

6. Morgan (Utah — 5%)

7. Cedar (Iowa — 5%)

8. Winneshiek (Iowa — 5%)

9. Griggs (North Dakota — 5%)

10. Geauga (Ohio — 6%)

Counties reporting the highest percentage of fair or poor health:

1. Hickory (Missouri — 51%)

2. Limestone (Texas — 50%)

3. Scott (Tennessee — 46%)

4. McCreary (Kentucky — 41%)

5. Dent (Missouri — 39%)

6. Magoffin (Kentucky — 39%)

7. Chambers (Alabama — 39%)

8. Owsley (Kentucky — 38%)

9. Greene (North Carolina — 38%)

10. Floyd (Kentucky — 38%)

Are there any readers from Hickory, Missouri or Blaine, Nebraska who would like to weigh in? What do you think? We'd love to hear from you!

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