Why The Key To Your Fertile 30s Lies In Your 20s

Does it seem you spent most of your 20s trying your darndest not to get pregnant, only to discover that now you’re 30-something the magic switch you thought you could flick over is malfunctioning? Rest assured, there are thousands of couples in the same boat. Many women are now finding themselves in their 30s, trying to rewind the clock and undo the destruction of their teens and 20s.

Unfortunately, we often fail to understand that these years shape our future. Hindsight is a wonderful and torturous thing. What we do as young adults can have major ramifications during our babymaking years. We live in a time when it's acceptable to assume we’ll "fix it once it is broken." Sadly, this has left many 30-somethings stranded. 

Living your life each and every day like it absolutely matters is something I feel I’m here to drive every young person to do. As a practitioner, I see many, many young girls who have suffered with eating disorders or hormone imbalances that are left untreated. Ignoring these conditions, especially over a long period of time, can be disastrous.

Living well takes a huge amount of effort. It’s a practice makes perfect kind of thing. We know that no one is perfect, but our lives get closer to a sort of wonderful perfection as we work on what works for us.

As infertility and in vitro fertilization rates climb, women are being forced to rethink the way they look at their health, specifically their fertility, because wellness and fertility are intrinsically linked. Women with endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome and hormonal imbalances are very aware that their fertility is potentially being compromised by these conditions, and therefore they must use this diagnosis to their benefit. With the knowledge that comes with a diagnosis, women are able to make treatment decisions that can impact their fertility future.

You might be in your twenties, and having a baby is the last thing on your mind. You might be in your thirties but have fertility challenges caused by illness, making you think medicine is the answer to fertility problems. You might even be past the pregnancy phase of your life but know somebody who's young, who needs support and fertility education. The truth is as women we should never stop learning about our health, especially when it comes to reproductive function – it spans from our first menstruation way into the years after our last.

So how do we keep learning and keep healthy? First, we realize that healthy fertility does not have to mean you want a baby and you want it now – it means you want to be at your optimum health. The best start is being mindful that you're not superhuman and your body requires a constant level of care. Exploring your options and getting to the crux of health issues is vital for building a solid foundation to serve yourself well for the years you and your body have ahead. We can’t always fall back on medications — they often fail to offer a solution to a broken body. Optimum health always comes back to simple wholesome lifestyle practices. Our 20-something’s youth is the key to our 30-something’s fertility.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

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About the Author

Natalie Kringoudis is a Doctor of Chinese Medicine, Acupuncturist, Speaker, Author and Producer.

She is also the owner of The Pagoda Tree a hub for natural fertility & women’s health in Australia.

Nat is on a crusade to share her knowledge to women and open their hearts to the possibilities that arrive when taking control of their health and fertility. Her dream is for all young women to understand how important their fertility is - to understand fertility isn't just about babies. Nat's released her e-course Debunking Ovulation and shares via her site through her books and videos reaching out to thousands of women in the quest to equip them with an abundance of information to allow them to make their own well informed health decisions.

She has recently gone onto produce & co-host her own web series, healthtalks and written two books; Fertilise Yourself and co-wrote Eat Fat, Be Thin.

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