Ratatouille and Quinoa
Try this delicious twist on the classic eggplant, zucchini, tomato, and bell pepper dish!


Quinoa with ratatouille gets you veggies and a complete protein in one meal. 

Serves 4
  • 5 ripe plum tomatoes (peeled and cored)
  • 2 zucchinis (stem and ends removed), cut on an angle into 1/2-inch slices
  • 2 eggplants (stem and ends removed), cut on an angle into 1/2-inch slices
  • 1 red pepper (cored), cut lengthwise into strips 2 inches wide and 1/2 inch thick
  • 1 green pepper (cored), cut lengthwise into strips 2 inches wide and 1/2 inch thick
  • 6 to 10 cloves garlic (sliced)
  • At least 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Sprigs of fresh thyme
  • A sprinkling of cayenne or chopped jalapeño (optional)
  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
Preheat the oven to 375 F (190 C).

In a 9"x13" oven-safe dish, layer the vegetables, beginning with eggplant. Then add the zucchini, garlic, peppers, and tomatoes, drizzling olive oil and scattering thyme leaves over the vegetables as you layer them. Salt and pepper the layers to taste, adding cayenne or jalapeño if desired.

Bake for about 40 minutes, pressing down the vegetables and stirring as they reach the desired softness.

Meanwhile, bring 2 cups of water plus 1 cup of quinoa, with salt and pepper to taste, to a boil.

Cover and reduce heat. Simmer until the quinoa is cooked, about 15 minutes.  

Serve the quinoa topped with ratatouille and sprinkled with pine nuts.

Note: The ratatouille can be prepared a day ahead. 

Nutrition: All figures are per serving (assumes 4 servings).

Calories: 476
Fat: 5 g
Carbs: 39 g
Fiber: 14 g
Protein: 9 g
Sodium: 31 mg

Watch this video for an eye-opening glimpse of where your food comes from and see how The Humane Society of the United States can help you stand up for animals, the planet, and your health—simply by sitting down to eat. 



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