How Journaling Can Boost Your Self-Confidence
Have you ever noticed how much an individual's success is a matter of self-confidence? People who are leaders possess a strong sense of self. They are confident in their ability to handle whatever situation arises. They believe in being, doing, achieving, and receiving the best at all times. They do not settle for second best.
 
Do you wonder where these people get their strong self-confidence and how you can build up your own?
 
Lack of self-confidence probably means an active Inner Critic that incessantly harps on inadequacies. It means underachieving, setting the bar nice and low so there won't be any major disappointment, expecting to fail, or at least not expecting to win. It's a viewpoint that is self-perpetuating, circular, and defeatist.
 
Lack of self-confidence is highly habit forming. It's really good at feeding on itself, perpetuating itself.
I lost last time so I'll probably lose again.
I can't do that, I already tried.
I haven't done anything yet, so I guess I never will.
 
The good news is that when self-confidence is strong and fully intact, it also will self-perpetuate.
 
So losers become bigger losers and winners become bigger winners, as time goes on.
 
Obviously, given the choice between the downward spiral of self-disapproval and the healthy growth that comes with self-confidence, most would select the latter. But for those who are mired in years of seeing themselves as inferior or inadequate, this may be easier said than done.
 
Enter journal writing, the personal practice that is arguably the best basic tool for self-growth known to human kind.
 
Turn to a new page in your journal and write: Where I want to be. Continue writing, describing this place that is the manifestation of your success. When you accomplish your dreams, this is how it will look.
 
The next day, turn to a new page and write, Where I am now and continue writing, describing your current status and point of view in relation to your success ideal.
 
Spend the next few days thinking, feeling, and writing about the connections between your dream and the present moment.
 
Turn to a fresh page and write: I want. Continue writing, describing in minute detail anything you can identify that you truly want.
 
Are there connections, similarities, jarring dissonances, or other pings in your awareness when you compare all these writings? Ferret them out and write them in your journal.
 
Over the next days, continue searching for your confidence, for the strength to do and believe and speak with power and firm faith in yourself. Ask yourself frankly,
  • What can I do?
  • What am I willing to do?
  • What am I afraid of?
  • Where can I find information, resources, and support?
  • What qualifies me to expect the very best?
Through a rationally sequential process of writing and reflecting, it's possible to find natural self-confidence by recognizing personal goals and intentions.
 
Journaling is a profoundly effective vehicle for boosting self-confidence and other life-changing transformations.
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About the Author
Mari L. McCarthy - The Journaling Therapy Specialist, founder of Journaling for the Self of It. Mari offers counseling and encouragement as well as hundreds of prompts through her many online journaling resources as well as private consultations. Please visit createwritenow.com. One of Mari's many publications is Who Are You? How to Use Journaling Therapy to Know and Grow Your Life, which is available here. She also leads a 27 Day Journaling Challenge designed to bring you to yourself in new and inspiring ways.  
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